Books by Jon Richards

THE HUMAN BODY by Jon Richards
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"These brave efforts to bring data to life are hobbled by unimaginative visuals. (index, websites) (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
Like its preceding titles (The Natural World, 2013, etc.), this attempt to illuminate factual information by presenting it in visual ways seldom exploits the graphic possibilities. Read full book review >
THE NATURAL WORLD by Jon Richards
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2013

"A trendy instructional tool, applied with mixed success both here and in the co-published Planet Earth, which gives our geology and atmosphere the same quick once-over. (Nonfiction. 8-10)"
Kicking off a series, this spotty tour of the biosphere demonstrates both the possibilities and the pitfalls of infographics. Read full book review >
TRAINS by Jon Richards
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

PLB 0-7613-0824-5 Future engineers and conductors will enjoy this fun and fact-filled entry in the Cutaway series. Richards introduces the reader-friendly topic of trains, from early steam locomotives to high-speed bullets. Eye-catching, full-color spreads that show cross-sections of train cars reveal the workings of different kinds of engines, as well as the varying degrees of luxury their passenger cars offer. Readers learn that the background of such legendary choo-choos as "the flying Scotsman," and "the Big Boy. ‘' Equally fascinating is the information presented on MagLevs, now in use in Europe and Japan. (glossary, index) (Picture book. 7-11) Read full book review >
THE YOUNG PEOPLE'S ATLAS OF THE WORLD by Jon Richards
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 1997

This atlas is but a small step forward from the principal-ports geography of earlier efforts, yet still supplies nuts-and-bolts coverage. Richards sets the stage with a cosmological/geological backdrop—his attempt at explaining the origin of the solar system is ludicrously brisk, although the foray into plate tectonics is more gratifying—then proceeds to the distribution of great waterways, mountain ranges, forest systems, grasslands, and deserts. Next are maps of political and physiographic boundaries, sadly lacking in color and verve, but conveying a sense of place through the iconographic artwork, national flags, and textual highlights. Richards wraps up the book with an abbreviated gazetteer—population, acreage, principal exports—that has little impact. The bare-bones approach won't inspire researchers; there is plenty of information in these pages, but it has not been knit into an effective whole. (maps, diagrams, charts, index) (Nonfiction. 8- 10) Read full book review >