Books by Josh Berk

SAY IT AIN'T SO by Josh Berk
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"Lenny is thrown several curves as he solves the mystery and finds a deeper appreciation of what it means to be a friend in this satisfying caper. (Mystery. 8-12)"
The second installment in the Lenny & the Mikes mysteries finds Lenny Norbeck and his friends Mike and Other Mike in seventh grade with a new case to solve. Read full book review >
STRIKE THREE, YOU'RE DEAD by Josh Berk
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2013

"An enjoyable baseball story that young fans will follow all the way to the bottom of the ninth. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Twelve-year-old Lenny Norbeck thought the contest to win a chance to broadcast one inning of a Phillies game would be fun. But it is murder. Literally. Read full book review >
GUY LANGMAN: CRIME SCENE PROCRASTINATOR by Josh Berk
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 13, 2012

"Realistic grief, humor, camp, crime investigation—and plenty of good boner jokes. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Hilarious wit and serious gloom blend seamlessly as Guy wades through the year after his dad's death. Read full book review >
THE DARK DAYS OF HAMBURGER HALPIN by Josh Berk
FICTION
Released: Feb. 9, 2010

This witty tale of mainstreaming, misfits and murder glitters like the "Future Diamonds" that coal-mine souvenirs promise to someday become. Sixteen-year-old Will lives in Pennsylvania coal country. Correct guesses on a hearing test and a false promise to wear hearing aids allow him to mainstream for the first time. Being fat and deaf is no social boost, and lip reading—easier for Will than for someone deaf since birth, but still sketchy—only goes so far. In a droll present tense, ironic and self-mocking but somehow also centered, Will talks about his ancestor namesake's appearance in a history book as a ghost, his class's field trip that turns murderous and his dry acquiescence to sleuthing, à la the Hardy Boys, with eager geek pal Smiley. Dickinson and Poe receive equally keen references (a stolen "Deaf Child" traffic sign beats metaphorically under Will's bed). Only a clichéd fatness explanation (overeating) and the implausibility of such highly successful lip reading distract; but the funny, clever voice and the small but spot-on thread of deaf politics make this a winner. (Fiction. 12-16)Read full book review >