Books by Joyce Hansen

HOME IS WITH OUR FAMILY by Joyce Hansen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Dec. 21, 2010

It is 1855 in Manhattan and Maria Peters is 13 years old. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 2003

Silent stone faces on a tunnel wall in Syracuse. Read full book review >

ONE TRUE FRIEND by Joyce Hansen
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

A semi-epistolary novel in which two friends help each other through hard times with a long-distance correspondence. Read full book review >

THE HEART CALLS HOME by Joyce Hansen
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

More than a decade after the publication of the first books in this trilogy (Which Way Freedom, 1986; Out From This Place 1988), Hansen completes her story of Obi and Easter, two escaped slaves from South Carolina, who become separated during the Civil War. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

A gorgeous series of black-and-white photographic portraits that were part of a campaign to show people, especially young African-Americans, that "greatness looks like them" form the heart of this book. Read full book review >

HISTORY
Released: April 1, 1998

From Hansen (Between Two Fires, 1993, etc.) and McGowan, a moving and enriching story of the discovery of an African burial ground located in lower Manhattan. Read full book review >

THE CAPTIVE by Joyce Hansen
FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

Loosely basing her story on an early slave narrative, the author of Which Way Freedom? (1986) and other evocations of the African-American experience describes the trials and triumphs of an Ashanti chieftain's son who is sold into slavery, transported to postcolonial Massachusetts (where slavery is outlawed, but frequently tolerated), and finally set free by Paul Cuffe, the black shipbuilder and captain. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 1993

Brought together in what novelist Hansen (Which Way Freedom?, 1986) calls a ``great experiment,'' black troops in the Civil War faced not only enemy armies but their own side's vicious racism while proving their ability. Read full book review >