Books by Judy Dockrey Young

1492 by Richard Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2013

"A respectful, sometimes irreverent and broadly multicultural treasury of dramas, romances, chillers, knee-slappers and teaching tales. (introduction) (Folk tales. 11-14, adult)"
In this much-expanded version of a 1992 collection, two veteran storytellers present tales that were being told in the Americas, North Africa and on the Iberian Peninsula the day Christopher Columbus made landfall. Read full book review >
THE SCARY STORY READER by Richard Young
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

The Youngs follow their Favorite Scary Stories of American Children (1990) with a collection of 42 urban legends and gruesome short-shorts—tales that include an assortment of escaped maniacs and terrorized teenagers; bloodily interrupted trysts; variants of the well-known ``Vanishing Hitchhiker''; a ``Terror Tour'' with stops for the Wendigo, ``The Thing in Lac De Smet,'' the ``Curse of Kilauea,'' and other regional chillers; anti-legends (``It flooooats...it flooooats''); and more stomach-wrenching episodes, all perfect for that campfire or darkened bedroom. But since the editors often choose story titles that give away punchlines, this is less satisfying for private reading than such books as Cohen's The Headless Roommate and Other Tales of Terror (1980); still, with its variety, introductory comments, source notes, and an afterword- -addressed to adults—on the benefits of scary stories, storytellers of all ages will JUMP! at it. Jan Harold Brunvand, dean of urban legendary, contributes a learned introduction. (Folklore. 10-13) Read full book review >
AFRICAN-AMERICAN FOLKTALES FOR YOUNG READERS by Richard Alan Young
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 1, 1993

Thirty-four tales (plus two poems) of tricksters and heroes- -fables, wonderfully scary stories (in a section called ``In the Park and In the Dark''), tall tales, and a pair of contemporary Br'er Rabbit stories, all retold in a respectful, unaffected style. Though some (e.g., ``Wylie and the Hairy Man'') are widely available in similar versions, others will make new connections for many readers—the portrait of Annie Christmas, a keelboat pilot and ``one tough woman''; or the two black men ``who made Casey [Jones] famous.'' The Youngs make another sort of connection in ``Three Young Men Go Out to Find Death,'' which they claim to be a direct ancestor of Chaucer's ``Pardoner's Tale.'' In a departure from the general trend for such collections, the editors are vague about sources; most of the tales are ``retold from folklore'' or ``inspired by the stories'' of prominent black storytellers (nine brief bios appended). Not a necessary purchase, but possibly useful to supplement books like Hamilton's The People Could Fly (1985) and the Youngs' own Favorite Scary Stories of American Children (1990). (Folklore. 11+) Read full book review >