Books by Julie McLaughlin

LITTLE CLOUD by Johanna  Wagstaffe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 18, 2020

"Probably clear enough for early weather watchers. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 6-8)"
An on-air meteorologist chronicles the development of a hurricane for very young readers and listeners. Read full book review >
THE SOMEDAY BIRDS by Sally J. Pla
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Hopeful, authentic, and oddly endearing. (Fiction. 8-12)"
While serving as a journalist in Afghanistan, a widowed father of four is injured, leaving him hospitalized and his children without a parent. Read full book review >
THE ART OF THE POSSIBLE by Edward Keenan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"Choice insights into the larger notion of politics as expressed through government, but the road is long between discerning nuggets. (glossary, sources, acknowledgments, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
An optimistically presented introduction to politics, mostly American, for those who don't even vote. Read full book review >
WHY WE LIVE WHERE WE LIVE by Kira Vermond
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 15, 2014

"This unusual book offers a surprising amount of information, organized and presented in an appealing way for upper-elementary students. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 8-11)"
Why do people choose to live where they do in our world? Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

Introducing a dozen North American eco-activists, most of them teenagers or younger adults, Rohmer conveys one inspirational success story after another. With the notable exception of El Hijo Del Santo, a Mexican masked wrestler who stages public events to draw attention to a range of environmental issues, the "heroes" here at least began their work on a local, grassroots level. Alex Lin coordinates an initiative to refurbish discarded computers and other e-waste; Debby Tewa promotes and installs solar-power systems on Arizona's Hopi Reservation; as a teenager Erica Fernandez stood up to protest the planned construction of a huge natural-gas pipeline through her California town. The author largely steers clear of technical details—which makes John Todd's invention of biological-waste filters and Kelydra Welcker's development of a method of testing water for the pollutant C-8 appear easier than seems likely—but provides plenty of encouragement for concerned young readers. Two-toned art and small, murky black-and-white photos add further notes of earnest purpose. (Nonfiction. 10-12) Read full book review >