Books by Ken Setterington

BRANDED BY THE PINK TRIANGLE by Ken Setterington
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 22, 2013

"Despite its brevity, a remarkably informative and necessary work. (notes, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 12 & up)"
An impassioned and cogent history of the persecution of gay men during the Holocaust. Read full book review >
MOM AND MUM ARE GETTING MARRIED! by Ken Setterington
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

Gay picture books are unfortunately still rare enough that they all matter regardless of literary and artistic quality. This one happens to be stilted and static. Rosie's Mom and Mum are getting married. Rosie's only concern is whether or not she'll get to be a flower girl, ring-bearer, or something else crucial to the ceremony (which she wishes would be bigger and fancier than it is). The concept and rightness of this two-mother family (and the same-sex marriage itself) are never questioned; there is no antagonist of the type often created specifically to facilitate a tolerance message. However, Setterington's text plods along, feeling forced. Priestley's drawings, though brightly colored, lack vibrancy and feel stale. This clearly deliberate piece has a worthy agenda and will stand in until better quality versions come along. Artistically tepid but socially valuable. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
THE WILD SWANS by Ken Setterington
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

Staying close to its Andersen roots, Setterington spins a beautiful retelling of a well-loved story. A king lost in the forest is rescued by a witch who gives him her daughter in marriage; fearing his wife, he hides his 11 sons and one daughter, Elise. The new queen turns the boys into swans, but doesn't see the daughter. Elise dreams the way of saving them by weaving each a shirt of stinging nettle; she must not speak while she is doing so. Although a king marries Elise, she continues her painful task and remains silent, even when she's accused of witchcraft. It's only when she's brought to be burnt at the stake that she finishes most of the last shirt and saves the brothers. This remarkable tale of sibling devotion, misleading action, and witchy ways is richer for its scherenschnitt—exquisite, intricate paper silhouettes. These black-on-white paper cuts display astonishing detail, while allowing imagination free rein. Few single editions of this story are available, making this an even more significant offering. (Folktale. 6-10)Read full book review >