Books by Lesley Harker

THE GOBLIN BABY by Berlie Doherty
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 26, 2009

Tam has a strong reaction when his new baby sister is born: "I wish that baby would go away!" But Great-grandpa's wisdom coupled with the present of his "most special thing," encourages Tam to hold his sister and declare his love. Transformed, Tam names his sister Blue and spends all his time playing with her or with his Great-grandpa's present—a kaleidoscope that he calls a starburster. Soon after Blue's birth, the horrible happens. Blue is stolen and a changeling called Pix is left in her place, and it's up to Tam to enter Faery to save his sister, with the help of the starburster, his memory and Pix herself. This is a fine introduction to the traditional changeling story, which is mostly unknown to American children. Harker's frequent black-and-white line illustrations help younger readers keep the story going, but the complexity of the tale is for more experienced readers than the usual audience for the Stepping Stones series. Those who find it will be rewarded: Tam and Blue are charming characters, and Doherty's storytelling is a treat. (Fantasy. 7-10)Read full book review >
CARLOS AND LITTLE WOLF by Lesley Harker
ANIMALS
Released: Dec. 15, 1996

As Carlos waits for his pomegranates to get big enough to eat, Little Wolf waits for himself to get big enough to eat Carlos. His plans fall through, however, and after a willy-nilly chase through town the two become friends. Little Wolf sets his sights on the teacher instead. Carlos emerges as a dreamy boy who loves to think about anything but his lessons, while Little Wolf stays in character, always leading with his stomach. These three easy-to- read stories are gently humorous, possessing more individuality than most; Little Wolf's perspective is funny, and the climactic scene where he and the teacher mix it up in a magic booth is hilarious. The illustrations, too, have much to recommend them. White scratchboard outlines and delicately colored watercolor washes fluidly complement the text. (Fiction. 4-7) Read full book review >