Books by Linda Coverdale

1914 by Jean Echenoz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A readable fictional introduction to the Great War for those who know nothing about it but inessential for anyone who's read Ernest Hemingway or John Roderigo Dos Passos."
Four young Frenchmen confront the grim reality of trench warfare in a spare, elliptical novel from Goncourt-winner Echenoz (Lightning, 2011, etc.). Read full book review >
THE CONSOLATIONS OF THE FOREST by Sylvain Tesson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 17, 2013

"Moving, wise and profound."
A French journalist's eloquently philosophical diary of the six months he spent fulfilling his dream to "live as a hermit deep in the woods" of Siberia. Read full book review >
LA PETITE by Michèle Halberstadt
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 10, 2012

"A haunting story with a triumphant conclusion."
Touching glimpse of a young life nearly lost and then redeemed. Read full book review >
LIVES OTHER THAN MY OWN by Emmanuel Carrère
Released: Sept. 13, 2011

"When it's about other people, this book often soars, but the somewhat self-satisfied autobiographical "I" keeps dragging it back down."
The latest from French writer/filmmaker Carrère (My Life as a Russian Novel, 2010, etc.) is an awkward but intermittently touching hybrid of novel and autobiography. Read full book review >
LIGHTNING by Jean Echenoz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2011

"They glitter, but don't expect more."
The latest, very short novel from the French Echenoz profiles the eccentric genius of electrical engineering, Nikola Tesla. Read full book review >
A PALACE IN THE OLD VILLAGE by Tahar Ben Jelloun
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 2011

"Poignant meditation on the enduring lure of home and the cost of being left behind."
After decades in France, a Moroccan immigrant yearns to return to his native village. Read full book review >
MY LIFE AS A RUSSIAN NOVEL by Emmanuel Carrère
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Aug. 3, 2010

"Intelligent, well-written and scrupulously honest, but off-puttingly self-involved."
French novelist/screenwriter/journalist Carrère (I Am Alive and You Are Dead: A Journey Inside the Mind of Philip K. Dick, 2003, etc.) recalls two fraught years that took him to Siberia and ended a love affair. Read full book review >
I AM NUJOOD, AGE 10 AND DIVORCED by Nujood Ali
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: March 2, 2010

"Despite the stylistic simplicity, this memoir will move readers."
With the assistance of Middle East journalist Minoui, Ali tells the disturbing story of her marriage and subsequent divorce—all by the age of ten. Read full book review >
RUNNING by Jean Echenoz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"An engaging but subdued portrait of a legend. "
Understated novel about the rise and fall of Czech runner Emil Zátopek. Read full book review >
THE ANTELOPE’S STRATEGY by Jean Hatzfeld
HISTORY
Released: March 24, 2009

"A telling report and a substantive addition to the literature of humanitarian aid and ethnic violence."
A searching companion to Libération correspondent Hatzfeld's Machete Season: The Killers in Rwanda Speak (2005), recounting events in Rwanda 15 years after the spasm of ethnic violence that left untold dead in its wake. Read full book review >
BEYOND SUSPICION by Tanguy Viel
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 2009

"Reads like William Faulkner trying his hand at a familiar story in the James M. Cain line."
A pair of noir-tinged lovers plot a fake kidnapping, forgetting that "with money things are never fake." Read full book review >
LIFE LAID BARE by Jean Hatzfeld
HISTORY
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Hatzfeld is to be commended for helping to preserve crucial eyewitness testimony and for sharing it with what one hopes will be a very large audience."
Arresting firsthand accounts of the 1994 Rwandan genocide from 14 men, women and children who survived the weeks of slaughter. Read full book review >
VIE FRANÇAISE by Jean-Paul Dubois
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2007

"Part realistic novel, part high-class soap opera, and absorbingly readable from first page to last."
The story of a French Everyman is told in this appealing 2004 novel, the first in English translation from a veteran journalist and fiction writer. Read full book review >
RAVEL by Jean Echenoz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2007

"An exquisitely written novel in which not much happens, yet everything is significant."
French author Echenoz (Piano, 2004, etc.) quietly chronicles the final ten years of composer Maurice Ravel's life. Read full book review >
FREEDOM by Malika Oufkir
Released: Oct. 11, 2006

"By turns delightful and frustrating."
Uneven follow-up to the Oprah-blessed hit Stolen Lives (2001). Read full book review >
MASSACRE RIVER by René Philoctète
Released: Nov. 30, 2005

"Philoctète's work is not an easy read; although dense with footnotes, for those unfamiliar with the history of the Dominican Republic, the story will remain somewhat opaque. "
A haunting, if unsatisfying, novel of the 1937 massacre of Haitians living on the Dominican border. Read full book review >
MACHETE SEASON by Jean Hatzfeld
Released: June 1, 2005

"Of the utmost importance. A trove for future historians and ethnographers seeking to explain the mechanics of genocide, and eye-opening, sobering reading for the rest of us."
Frontline reportage from one of the world's more recent genocides, as narrated by the foot soldiers who perpetrated it. Read full book review >
MAKING LOVE by Jean-Philippe Toussaint
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Edgy prose that elegantly distills a disturbing take on love."
From the author of Monsieur (1991), etc., a moody, often claustrophobic, and viscerally intense evocation of the end of an affair that's begun in France and ends in Japan. Read full book review >
ABSOLUTE PERFECTION OF CRIME by Tanguy Viel
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 27, 2003

"And asking the cover price for 130 pages of such thin gruel might just be the absolute perfection of chutzpah."
They call themselves a crime family, but that's hyperbole: They're nickel-and-dimers, and they know it. Read full book review >
THE BLINDING ABSENCE OF LIGHT by Tahar Ben Jelloun
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2002

"The story's sensibility and emphases seem at times inalienably remote, but whenever Ben Jelloun focuses on Salim's (quite universal) imagined continuing relation with the world from which he has been in effect exiled, it exudes a very nearly Dostoevskyan concentration and power."
This semi-documentary novel from the Moroccan-born author of The Sacred Night (1989) and The Sand Child (1987) joins the long list of prison books descended from Dostoevsky's The House of the Dead. Read full book review >
UNDERCURRENTS by Marie Darrieussecq
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"A beautifully constructed little nightmare: Darrieussecq's best yet."
A woman "kidnaps" her young daughter—or so it initially appears—in this skillfully understated third novel from the young French author of Pig Tales (1997) and My Phantom Husband (1999). Read full book review >
THE ADVERSARY by Emmanuel Carrère
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 9, 2001

"True-life crime, bald and sordid, told with the quality of a weightless incantation."
A grim recounting—almost a slice of living theater—of a loathsome crime committed in France nearly ten years ago, from French novelist Carrère (Class Trip, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >
SPEAK YOU ALSO by Paul Steinberg
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 12, 2000

"A sad phenomenology of human degradation."
A former prisoner of Auschwitz recounts his experience in the camp and his hellish transformation into what he calls an "extermination-camp man"—a human sub-species focused solely on survival and lacking all feelings and the attendant care for others. Read full book review >
MAMZELLE DRAGONFLY by Raphael Confiant
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2000

"Intriguing and intermittently dramatic, but awfully sketchy. Chamoiseau and Danticat do it better."
An overwhelmingly lush ambiance and its attractive protagonist are the chief pleasures of this otherwise rather lax 1987 novel (and US debut) by Confiant, a Martinican author who will remind many readers of the better-known Patrick Chamoiseau and Edwidge Danticat. Read full book review >
CHRONICLE OF THE SEVEN SORROWS by Patrick Chamoiseau
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 19, 1999

"Don't be surprised if the accomplished Chamoiseau emerges as one of the new century's leading Nobel prize candidates."
Chronicle Of The Seven Sorrows ($25.00; Nov. 19; 226 pp.; 0-8032-1495-2) The first novel (published in 1986 in France) by the Martiniquean author of Texaco and Solibo Magnificent, among other colorful fiction and autobiography, is a raffish mock epic celebration of his island homeland's energetically mixed (French and Creole) language and culture. Read full book review >
CREOLE FOLKTALES by Patrick Chamoiseau
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"But the evil characters are caricatures; others are generally so unpleasant that readers will not be moved to root for them. (Folklore. 11+)"
 Chamoiseau, who is French, makes his U.S. debut with a collection of folktales based on the ones he listened to as a child. Read full book review >
THE GRAIN OF THE VOICE by Roland Barthes
PSYCHOLOGY
Released: Nov. 1, 1984

Although the late Roland Barthes says at one point here that he does not like giving interviews, this volume contains 39 of them—and still others, according to an editorial note, may also have taken place. Read full book review >