Books by Linda Urban

ROAD TRIP WITH MAX AND HIS MOM by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 17, 2018

"A winsome story for readers newly transitioned to chapter books. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Third-grader Max, who is still adjusting to his parents' separation, is going on a road trip with his mom to a family reunion. Read full book review >
WEEKENDS WITH MAX AND HIS DAD by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 5, 2016

"A sweet, empathetic look at a common situation. (Fiction. 6-10)"
During a series of visits with his dad in his new apartment, Max begins adjusting to his parents' recent separation. Read full book review >
MILO SPECK, ACCIDENTAL AGENT by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Imaginative, kooky, but too devoid of reality to be fully engaging, this story is likely to score with its demographic but will not find converts outside it. (Adventure. 8-12)"
When a boy is magically transported to Ogregon, a world of gigantic but mostly small-brained ogres, he must figure out not only how to escape before being eaten, but also how to rescue a group of captives and plug the hole between worlds. Read full book review >
LITTLE RED HENRY by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 28, 2015

"A story that humorously but gently reminds overprotective families that it is natural and necessary and healthy for a child to learn to do for himself. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A picture book about a youngest child who wants to grow up...but the rest of the family isn't ready to let him. Read full book review >
CENTER OF EVERYTHING by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 5, 2013

"A poignant, finely wrought exploration of grief. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Sixth-grader Ruby Pepperdine always used to be "good at figuring out what she was supposed to do," but since her grandmother's death, she's lost the center of everything. Read full book review >
HOUND DOG TRUE by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2011

"This outstanding, emotionally resonant effort will appeal to middle-grade readers. (Fiction. 8-12)"
With a little help from a caring adult, a child crippled by shyness begins to bloom. Read full book review >
MOUSE WAS MAD by Linda Urban
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

While never communicating quite what Mouse is mad about at the outset, this charmingly illustrated title takes readers through several possible methods of expressing said anger. Mouse tries to blow off steam by hopping, stomping, screaming and rolling, but in each case, another animal is ready with both a sharp critique and a demonstration of superior skill in the category at hand. Practicing these techniques lands Mouse in increasingly mucky mud puddles. Finally in caked overalls, he is really (times four) mad. "Standing-still mad." This in-character manifestation fairly bedazzles his associates. " ‘Impressive,' said Hare. / ‘What control,' said Bear. / ‘Are you breathing?' asked Hedgehog." Urban unfurls the gentle "be true to yourself" moral perfectly, with plenty of funny dialogue, overplayed reaction and the enduring appeal of the tiny hero. Cole's terrific watercolors reflect Mouse's emotional growth in spreads and spots brimming with movement. Who knew standing still could be so dramatic? Well-pitched for preschoolers just learning social skills, this would be equally excellent for family reading, classrooms and storytimes. (Picture book. 3-7)Read full book review >
A CROOKED KIND OF PERFECT by Linda Urban
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

All ten-year-old Zoe Elias has ever wanted is a baby grand so that she can become a star who dazzles Carnegie Hall. She doesn't know how to play, but that's a minor stumbling block. What she gets instead is an old, wheezy organ, a gift from her well-meaning, agoraphobic dad. While workaholic mom is hardly ever home, Zoe resigns herself to learning to play the instrument, all the while encouraged by her skittish father and a newfound supportive pal. Wouldn't you know that she turns out to be great at it and goes on to win in competition? There's a lot of knowing, child-friendly humor here, not the least provided by Zoe's hoot of an organ instructor. Readers should enjoy the fast-paced, brief chapters, silliness and tongue-in-cheek first-person narration. The author doesn't pull out all the stops, and the ending is pat, but this is still a satisfying read. (Fiction. 9-12)Read full book review >