Books by Lizi Boyd

WHO LOVES BOOKS? by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 11, 2020

"Every book its reader, as the old meme goes, and vice versa. (Novelty picture book. 4-6)"
Squirrel pairs each wild animal with just the right reading matter in this paean to the pleasures of print. Read full book review >
HIDE-AND-SLEEP by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 9, 2019

"The lively interiors belie the word 'Sleep' in the title; this is high-energy fun. (Board book. 6 mos.-3)"
This split-paged book with a tall trim encourages the youngest readers to look closely at the forest and meadow scenes. Read full book review >
NIGHT PLAY by Lizi Boyd
by Lizi Boyd, illustrated by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 6, 2018

"A clever introduction to theater for young audiences or performers (and an inspiration for post-bedtime play). (Picture book. 3-6)"
Usually it is the sleepless child who invents a nocturnal story for his or her stuffed animals to enact; Boyd imagines the reverse. Read full book review >
A NAME FOR BABY by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 19, 2018

"Inconsistent writing combines with sweet illustrations to make this a nice-enough book. (Picture book. 2-5)"
With the help of woodland creatures, Mother Mouse searches for a name for her new baby that sounds just right. Read full book review >
BIG BEAR LITTLE CHAIR by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"A beautiful and creative exploration of size and relativity. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Examples of "big," "little," and "tiny" produce unexpected juxtapositions. Read full book review >
FLASHLIGHT by Lizi Boyd
Kirkus Star
by Lizi Boyd, illustrated by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 12, 2014

"Contemplative children will spend hours on each page, noticing such subtleties as reappearing animals and the slowly rising moon over the course of one night in the forest. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A wordless picture book both soothing and gently humorous. Read full book review >
INSIDE OUTSIDE by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"Inspired and inspiring, this is creative genius at work. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In this wordless picture book, youngsters follow a boy through the seasons and see how the natural world influences his indoor projects and outdoor activities. Read full book review >
BLACK DOG GETS DRESSED by Lizi Boyd
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

A little boy dresses his black dog from head to toe in everything from underpants to jacket and socks: "I like the shirt with stripes, do you? Up, Black Dog, It's too hard to dress you when you're lying down." The little boy is clearly in charge, choosing the various items of clothing and colors for his pet's outfit, mixing and matching stripes, dots, and solids. He then retreats behind the puppet stage to dress himself, emerging as a canine complete in black doggy costume. Patience, perseverance, and playful role reversal are casually portrayed through this genial display of a preschooler's daily dressing ritual, one that parents and children will recognize. Basic outlined gouache illustrations in bright teals and purples delineate both boy and dog's fun-loving actions. Sweet toddler amusement. (Picture book. 1-3)Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

The host to a set of feathered and furry friends in his garden is supplanted by the female Lulu Crow in this retelling of Johnny Crow's Garden (1903), with full-color gouache paintings to replace the original droll pen-and-ink line drawings by Leslie Brooke. The text is essentially the same, still appearing in rhymed couplets, "And the Lion/Had a green-and-yellow Tie on/In Lulu Crow's Garden." Some repetition of the refrain is cut to shorten the story; a few words and ideas that may not be familiar to contemporary children have been modified. Instead of Fox putting all the animals in stocks, they're shut inside a blue box; the stork no longer gives a philosophic talk, nor does the elephant say something irrelevant. Boyd's simplified shapes may lack the range of human expression that so characterizes the original, but the illustrator makes up for it in playful details: Lion lounging on a garden bench; Crane sporting an umbrella in the rain; and Pig dancing on a jig. Blocks of pastel colors are rolled out like swatches of fabric to create a stretch of sea-green lawn or a patch of periwinkle-blue sky. Tiger lilies, sunflowers, hollyhocks, and morning glories serve as props that brighten each background. Young ones will enjoy the superficially silly rhyme, but don't let them miss the nonsense of the original. (Picture book. 2-5) Read full book review >
SWEET DREAMS, WILLY by Lizi Boyd
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 1, 1992

After Willy's indulgent parents finally put him to bed, he imagines who might still be awake: a bird that carries him through the air; a deer that gives him an apple; fish; the wind. Each of these eventually goes to sleep, murmuring ``Sweet dreams.'' In the end, a star takes Willy home and tucks him in. It's all a pleasant variation on a familiar theme, although not particularly imaginative. Boyd's illustrations, always her strong suit, are attractive: softly glowing colors with muted blues and brighter pinks predominate; stylized figures, though they convey little character or feeling, are skillfully combined for a pleasingly decorative effect. An appealing bedtime story. (Picture book. 2-6) Read full book review >
WILLY AND THE CARDBOARD BOXES by Lizi Boyd
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1991

The day Dad's new computer arrives, Willy goes to the office with him to spend a happy day playing with the boxes, building everything from a plane to a circus. The resulting constructions are more the products of Boyd's (and Willy's) imagination than likely accomplishments of a preschooler, and are only occasionally linked to his real experiences (tired, he builds a house and falls asleep in it at the end of the day). Still, the make-believe adventures are nicely realized in Boyd's gentle, stylized art. (Picture book. 2-6) Read full book review >