Books by L.K. Madigan

THE MERMAID'S MIRROR by L.K.  Madigan
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

Sixteen-year-old Lena becomes angry when her father won't let her learn to surf in this new supernatural romance. Lena is powerfully attracted to the sea, so she decides to defy her dad. She's sure she saw a mermaid in the surf off her California beach home and wants to get closer to the creature. Lena will find out more than she could have known about herself and the mermaid when she finds a magic mirror, hidden by her dad, that shows Lena scenes so compelling that she can't resist running to the sea. It seems that the mermaid wants Lena. Readers will need to decide if the mermaid's hold on Lena is beneficial or not when the story turns to complete fantasy as Lena begins a new life under the sea. Madigan captures Lena's adolescent angst extremely well when the girl makes some risky decisions, and she follows her character's deepening comprehension of her circumstances as she finds love with a handsome merman. The story accurately portrays California's surfing culture, which makes the fantasy believable. Poignant entertainment. (Fantasy. 12 & up)Read full book review >
FLASH BURNOUT by L.K.  Madigan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

Fifteen-year-old photographer-in-training Blake is caught between fawning over his gorgeous girlfriend Shannon and helping Marissa, his troubled photography partner, a friend who also happens to be a girl. At first, the three handle the tension with uneasy understanding, but the uncertainty builds as Blake begins to spend more time with Marissa, locking Shannon out of their secrets. Madigan also throws a lovable goofball brother, Marissa's meth-addicted mom and a morgue into the mix. Like any boy his age, Blake thinks about sex a lot. The narrative handles his hormones well, safely focusing on his character's inner yearnings and providing just enough gritty details to feel realistic. The dialogue between the characters, especially the "dude" repartee between Blake and his brother, feels genuinely alive. Overplotting is the novel's only fault, but the details are just intriguingly bizarre enough to hook teens of both sexes and keep them engrossed by the naïvely unsteady love triangle. Somehow, all of the loose ends get tied up into a haphazard yet entertaining read. (Fiction. YA)Read full book review >