Books by Lorna J. Sass

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 20, 1994

One of the factors keeping vegetarian eating from going completely mainstream is the amount of time required to cook whole foods. Pressure cooking doyenne Sass (Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen, not reviewed) explains how to use the new pressure cookers (no splattering or sputtering) to prepare fresh, vegan fare (occasionally dairy options are suggested), including cakes. Some of the information here—particularly the pantry section—builds on her earlier work, but the recipes are new, and their cooking times are nothing short of miraculous: split pea hummus in eight minutes, risotto with broccoli rabe and white beans in five, and with barely any stirring necessary. Sass has always cooked for the modern world, and if anyone can manage to make this somewhat intimidating gadget a familiar sight in every kitchen, it will be her. *justify no* One of the factors keeping vegetarian eating from going completely mainstream is the amount of time required to cook whole foods. Pressure cooking doyenne Sass (Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen, not reviewed) explains how to use the new pressure cookers (no splattering or sputtering) to prepare fresh, vegan fare (occasionally dairy options are suggested), including cakes. Some of the information here—particularly the pantry section—builds on her earlier work, but the recipes are new, and their cooking times are nothing short of miraculous: split pea hummus in eight minutes, risotto with broccoli rabe and white beans in five, and with barely any stirring necessary. Sass has always cooked for the modern world, and if anyone can manage to make this somewhat intimidating gadget a familiar sight in every kitchen, it will be her. *justify no* One of the factors keeping vegetarian eating from going completely mainstream is the amount of time required to cook whole foods. Pressure cooking doyenne Sass (Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen, not reviewed) explains how to use the new pressure cookers (no splattering or sputtering) to prepare fresh, vegan fare (occasionally dairy options are suggested), including cakes. Some of the information here—particularly the pantry section—builds on her earlier work, but the recipes are new, and their cooking times are nothing short of miraculous: split pea hummus in eight minutes, risotto with broccoli rabe and white beans in five, and with barely any stirring necessary. Sass has always cooked for the modern world, and if anyone can manage to make this somewhat intimidating gadget a familiar sight in every kitchen, it will be her. *justify no* One of the factors keeping vegetarian eating from going completely mainstream is the amount of time required to cook whole foods. Pressure cooking doyenne Sass (Recipes from an Ecological Kitchen, not reviewed) explains how to use the new pressure cookers (no splattering or sputtering) to prepare fresh, vegan fare (occasionally dairy options are suggested), including cakes. Some of the information here—particularly the pantry section—builds on her earlier work, but the recipes are new, and their cooking times are nothing short of miraculous: split pea hummus in eight minutes, risotto with broccoli rabe and white beans in five, and with barely any stirring necessary. Sass has always cooked for the modern world, and if anyone can manage to make this somewhat intimidating gadget a familiar si Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 18, 1992

To the old nursery-song list of oats, peas, beans, and barley, today's ecological cooks add aduki beans, quinoa, seitan (a wheat product that claims to mimic meat), tempeh, udon (Japanese buckwheat noodles), basmati and wild rice, shiitake mushrooms, and a recently imported Asian barley called ``Job's Tears.'' From such as these, plus some currently obligatory ingredients like arborio rice (for risotto), jalape§os, and roasted red peppers, Sass has put together a nicely balanced recipe collection with a global reach, a contemporary edge, and a good feet-on-the-ground respect for real food. Though its impact on the planet may be negligible, this should appeal to novice natural-food fans and browsers, and it might add some dash to the diets of the long committed. (Twenty-five color illustrations—not seen.) Read full book review >