Books by Lucha Corpi

THE TRIPLE BANANA SPLIT BOY/EL NIÑO GOLOSO by Lucha Corpi
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 31, 2009

"Flawed in its delivery and appeal. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Enrique, el niño goloso, is a boy with a sweet tooth, utterly unable to control his extreme desire for sugary foods. Read full book review >
CRIMSON MOON by Lucha Corpi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 31, 2004

"Corpi (Black Widow's Wardrobe, 1999) draws a few compelling characters and family dynamics, but, unfortunately, they're obscured by prolonged and clunky exposition."
Politically active Latinas at Berkeley in the '60s discover 30 years later that politics is always personal. Read full book review >
WHERE FIREFLIES DANCE/AHI, DONDE BAILAN LAS LUCIÉRNAGAS by Lucha Corpi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Fireflies and a number of photographs (presumably of Corpi's family) figure into the illustrations, each of which has a uniquely appropriate border. (Picture book. 6-9)"
The CIP data calls this bilingual tale fiction, but Corpi's afterword places the story ``where imagination and memory blend.'' She recalls a night during her childhood, in the small Mexican town of J†ltipan, when she and her older brother, Victor, explored a ruined house, once home of the revolutionary fighter Juan Sebasti†n. Read full book review >
CACTUS BLOOD by Lucha Corpi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1995

"A well-nigh impenetrable mystery full of stilted dialogue, murky scene-setting, wild poetry, and furious evocations of the 1973 grape boycott and 1989 Oakland earthquake."
Twenty years ago, Carlota Navarro—escaping from the doctor who'd smuggled her into the US, used her as a cook-housekeeper, and raped her—ran through a field newly fertilized with parathion, or devil's blood. Read full book review >
EULOGY FOR A BROWN ANGEL by Lucha Corpi
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 31, 1992

"Awkward and slow moving at times, but still worthwhile mystery-reading."
Corpi (Delia's Song—not reviewed) brings a Chicana feminist perspective to the mystery genre and does so with enough originality to overcome some stilted and murky writing. Read full book review >