Books by Marc Laidlaw

MARY SHELLEY'S FRANKENSTEIN by Marc Laidlaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 7, 2017

"Tongue-in-cheek literary amendments, all done without ridicule or a pretense of improving the beloved original."
Laidlaw (400 Boys and 50 More, 2016, etc.) revamps Shelley's horror classic to include a bevy of monsters throughout the entire narrative. Read full book review >
THE THIRD FORCE by Marc Laidlaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Beautifully composed and full of high-level concepts (such as a virtual library and binoculars that allow one to look upon the future), but weighed down, in the end, by a plot that is strictly Buck Rogers."
Doomsday tale suggested by a CD-ROM game called Gadget, by the author of Kalifornia (1993) and The 37th Mandala, published earlier this year. Read full book review >
THE 37TH MANDALA by Marc Laidlaw
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 12, 1996

"Deserves high marks indeed—and those mandalas cry out for celluloid computerization."
Blending outrÇ-dimensional, drooly-tentacled, Lovecraftian slipslop weirdness with Robert A. Heinlein's The Puppet Masters, Laidlaw (Kalifornia, 1993, etc.) lays out a work far more fine- grained than Heinlein's and nearly as compelling as Lovecraft's. Read full book review >
THE ORCHID EATER by Marc Laidlaw
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 1994

"Not heartwarming."
Another well-written but depressing dystopian thriller by Laidlaw (Kalifornia, 1992; Dad's Nuke, 1985). Read full book review >
KALIFORNIA by Marc Laidlaw
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

From the author of Dad's Nuke (1985), an in-jokey, cyberpunkish glimpse of a near-future West Coast, wherein everybody is ``wired'' with artificial nerves and thus able to receive full sensory experiences—including commercials—from those few rigged to ``wirecast''; the latter are, of course, the stars of Laidlaw's TV-gone-mad world. Read full book review >