Books by Marcel Proust

THE PRISONER by Marcel Proust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2019

"A classic work of early modernist literature given new life, thereby to fuel a new conversation about the book and its author in a decidedly different world."
American edition of the "new," non-Moncrieff translation of Proust's posthumous novel, a story and a metastory alike that are full of tangles. Read full book review >
LETTERS TO HIS NEIGHBOR by Marcel Proust
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A trove of charming correspondence from literature's most famous 'noise phobic.'"
Recently discovered letters from Proust to a Paris neighbor show the author's kindness even when he complained about the noise. Read full book review >
SODOM AND GOMORRAH by Marcel Proust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"An essential building-block in the construction of a modern masterpiece."
Part four of the new six-volume Penguin Proust complicates the romantic and social life of autobiographical protagonist Marcel with the specter of "inversion." Read full book review >
THE GUERMANTES WAY by Marcel Proust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 7, 2004

"But whatever your preference, Proust is a pleasure no serious reader should miss. (Volume 4, Sodom and Gomorrah, will appear in fall 2004)."
The latest in the adventurous and expert new edition of In Search of Lost Time (see Jan. 1 editorial). Read full book review >
THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES OF MARCEL PROUST by Marcel Proust
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

All the fiction Proust (1871-1922) wrote, in addition to his autobiographical Jean Santeuil and his great seven-volume Remembrance of Things Past, is collected in this attractive volume, which contains the text of his first book, Pleasures and Days (1896), with a few semifictional journalistic sketches added, and six previously untranslated "early stories." The latter are mostly dated ephemera devoid of narrative tension ("The Indifferent Man" being a partial exception). The former, though self-indulgent and uneven, do comprise a winning composite portrait of early-20th-century Parisian street, salon, and bedroom scenes—ranging from the Balzacian melodrama of "Confessions of a Young Girl" to the agreeably jaded rhythms of "The Melancholy Summer of Madame de Breyven" (which one can imagine Colette enjoying). Critic Roger Shattuck's claim (in his Foreword) that these sketches stand to Proust's masterpiece in somewhat the same relation as does Joyce's Dubliners to his Ulysses won't convince anybody. But readers who adore the mature Proust won't want to miss them. Read full book review >