Books by Margo Lanagan

YELLOWCAKE by Margo Lanagan
Released: May 14, 2013

"Familiar roots and accessible themes make this strong collection a good introduction to Lanagan's mind-bending work. (author's note) (Fantasy/short stories. 14 & up)"
Lanagan unravels familiar myths and fairy tales, weaving them into unique, sharply resonant forms in this characteristically stunning collection. Read full book review >
THE BRIDES OF ROLLROCK ISLAND by Margo Lanagan
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"Bracing, powerful, resonant. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
In this spellbinding, intricately layered novel, the Printz Honor winner (Tender Morsels, 2008) puts her unique spin on selkies—haunting, mysterious, seal-human shape-shifters in a world of hardscrabble fishing villages, lonely islands and cold, restless seas. Read full book review >
TENDER MORSELS by Margo Lanagan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 14, 2008

"Not to be missed. (Fantasy. 15 & up)"
Lanagan's debut U.S. novel after three spectacular short-story collections, including the Printz Honor-winning Black Juice (2005), scintillates, titillates and altogether wows. Read full book review >
RED SPIKES by Margo Lanagan
FICTION
Released: Oct. 9, 2007

"Bound to baffle and delight, this is not for everyone, but will reward the patient reader. (Short stories/fantasy. YA)"
Lanagan's searing prose and bizarre, whimsical vision once again pull together in a fascinating, baffling and rewarding collection. Read full book review >
WHITE TIME by Margo Lanagan
FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Ranging from shocking to poignant, arch to tragic, each compelling entry is rich in imaginative twists and details, and will engender strong, complex reactions from readers. (Short stories. YA)"
From the author of the exemplary collection Black Juice (2005), ten more stories featuring teenagers (mostly) living in or encountering alternate realities. Read full book review >
BLACK JUICE by Margo Lanagan
FICTION
Released: March 1, 2005

These ten new tales from Down Under take readers to worlds like, yet tantalizingly unlike, their own. Read full book review >