Books by Margot Arnold

THE MIDAS MURDERS by Margot Arnold
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 8, 1995

"Smoothly written but ultimately a bore."
Their twelfth crime-solving adventure (Dirge for a Dorset Druid, etc.) finds American anthropologist Dame Penny Spring, a lecturer at Oxford, and Sir Tobias Glendower, her archaeologist partner, with an invitation from old acquaintance Jules Lefau, a New Orleans millionaire, to cruise the Greek islands on his yacht Silver Spray. Read full book review >
DIRGE FOR A DORSET DRUID by Margot Arnold
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 25, 1994

"For loyalists only, and you have to wonder about them."
Back in England after The Cape Cod Conundrum (1993), Sir Toby Glendower, a victim of his own tediously detailed academic success, is invited by his old student Stephen Farwell, curator of the Dorset County Museum, to act as consultant on the excavation of a henge newly discovered in downtown Dorset. Read full book review >
THE CAPE COD CONUNDRUM by Margot Arnold
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 25, 1993

"Less sniping between Toby and Penny—a plus—and a better effort than usual from the fair-to-middling Arnold."
After their recent services to the Crown (The Catacomb Conspiracy), aging archaeologist Toby Glendower and anthropologist Penny Spring are en route to the rented Cape Cod home of their offspring for a much-needed rest. Read full book review >
THE CATACOMB CONSPIRACY by Margot Arnold
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"This long-running (nine titles), lackluster series, with its idiosyncratic detective team, stodgy dialogue, and everything-but- the-kitchen-sink plotting, will draw no new admirers with this outing, but loyalists will find it on a par with The Menehune Murders (1989)."
Pesky American anthropologist Penny Spring and her crusty, antisocial best friend, British archaeologist Sir Tobias Glendower, while vacationing in a Roman villa, encounter two murders, a kidnapping, a disappearance, and Inspector Cicco—who wishes they'd stop nosing around and just go home. Read full book review >