Books by Mark Dunn

WE FIVE by Mark Dunn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"A fire, an earthquake, a bombing, a long-lost brother, some gay and lesbian intrigue, a few near deaths and a few more actual ones: the plot will carry you swiftly through the book, but by the end, it deposits you on shaky ground."
A novel of female friendship and destabilizing romance that spans decades and continents. Read full book review >
UNDER THE HARROW by Mark Dunn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2010

"Does it last? Readers are left guessing to the very end. This is a lively, thoughtful and beautifully written flight of fancy."
Imagine Plato's Republic as founded by the child of Diderot and Charles Dickens, without the fascism but with plenty of rules: That's Dingley Dell, a place where life is "perpetually shrouded in impenetrable mystery." Read full book review >
IBID: A LIFE by Mark Dunn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2004

"Humorous, quick like the wind: fiction that peers at an imaginary life never head-on but through a multitude of sideways glances, peeking through fingers and intimating stranger things than can be imagined in the light of day."
Having an extra leg doesn't mean you can't have a full life. Read full book review >
WELCOME TO HIGBY by Mark Dunn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Characters largely conventional, slightly soulful, and just a bit off their nut are the tried-and-true formula of any wacky southern farce, but success here stems also from the delightful way so many lives are seamlessly made utterly interdependent."
The feckless frolics of a Mississippi town fill the pages of Dunn's clever, comical second outing, which romps on the heels of his acclaimed Ella Minnow Pea (2001). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Cleverness is the hook with this little fable—those delighting in wordplay will be duly rewarded by seeing language stretched to its limits."
A mostly lighthearted tweaking of literary sensibilities, playwright Dunn's first novel gets good mileage from a simple notion: People can carry hero worship way too far. Read full book review >