Books by Mark Gonyea

ONE LITTLE MONSTER by Mark Gonyea
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 24, 2018

"Would that all children could greet their own monsters with this much aplomb. (Picture book. 4-8)"
What starts as one little monster on a child's windowsill quickly gets out of hand. Read full book review >
THE SPOOKY BOX by Mark Gonyea
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 2, 2013

"For those pleasantly surprised and inspired by the title's open-endedness, though, possibilities abound for creative writing or art activities. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A sophisticated attempt to build suspense and awaken the imagination may ultimately fail to deliver a satisfying conclusion for most readers. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 13, 2010

This shiny, cheerful lesson has mixed success conveying concepts. Well-chosen subject matter includes definitions, color mixing and color vibes. Unfortunately, the arbitrary organization calls each hue a "house" on "Color Street," making the spectrum linear rather than circular. (A color wheel appears only at the end.) Hue implications are intriguing ("Red is loving. / Red is dangerous. / Orange is cheerful. / Orange is powerful"), but low value gets the shaft ("Darker values have more black and can make things seem creepy and menacing"—yes, sometimes, but what about cozy Goodnight Moon?). The text clearly explains mixing primaries to create secondaries, but large, blocky cut-paper-style digital shapes don't show blending the way paint—or digital images chipped into smaller bits—could have. Most egregious is an error defining complementary colors as the primary and secondary that "work well together... / [l]ike" Christmas's red and green; that's the common-usage definition of "complementary," whereas the technical art term "complementary" means sitting opposite on the color wheel and creating a neutral gray/brown when mixed. Bright, glossy and flawed; excellent idea, less-than-excellent execution. (Informational picture book. 6-10)Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

A clean, clear, lighthearted look at the communicative clout of color, contrast and contour. With a playful wink and lots of white space, Gonyea speaks directly to readers, inviting engagement as a vehicle to understanding fundamentals of design while allowing bright, bold graphics to speak for themselves. Ellipses and parenthetical asides affect a cozy, conspiratorial tone. Amusing, sometimes enigmatic chapter headings like "1:3:9" (an exponential ratio of weight and balance in composition) introduce dynamic demonstrations that prove the power of the purposeful arrangement of the parts of a picture. Heeding its own advice and avoiding highfalutin' theory, this pithy, deceptively simple work is far more visual than verbal (under 450 words), offering an experience in graphic communication rather than a treatise. Artists, educators and other fans of Molly Bang's bible, Picture This (2000), will delight in this energetic treatment of the whys and wherefores of relationship and relativity in illustration and will want it in core collections. It should find a place in every collection. (Nonfiction. 6+)Read full book review >
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: June 1, 2005

A clean, clear, lighthearted look at the communicative clout of color, contrast and contour. With a playful wink and lots of white space, Gonyea speaks directly to readers, inviting engagement as a vehicle to understanding fundamentals of design while allowing bright, bold graphics to speak for themselves. Ellipses and parenthetical asides affect a cozy, conspiratorial tone. Amusing, sometimes enigmatic chapter headings like "1:3:9" (an exponential ratio of weight and balance in composition) introduce dynamic demonstrations that prove the power of the purposeful arrangement of the parts of a picture. Heeding its own advice and avoiding highfalutin' theory, this pithy, deceptively simple work is far more visual than verbal (under 450 words), offering an experience in graphic communication rather than a treatise. Artists, educators and other fans of Molly Bang's bible, Picture This (2000), will delight in this energetic treatment of the whys and wherefores of relationship and relativity in illustration and will want it in core collections. It should find a place in every collection. (Nonfiction. 6+)Read full book review >