Books by Mark Leyner

GONE WITH THE MIND by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 6, 2016

"It's pointless trying to classify or summarize Leyner's work. By now readers who get it are prepared to buy the ticket and take the ride."
Things have been positively normal around here for a while; it must be time for another dose of Leyner (The Sugar Frosted Nutsack, 2012, etc.).Read full book review >
THE SUGAR FROSTED NUTSACK by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 26, 2012

"Anyone who's still with us by now should embrace this earnest exploitation of the myths of the new world, complete with celebrity cameos."
Whom the gods would destroy, they would not only make mad but also molest, punish and celebrate, all in a day's work. Read full book review >
THE TETHERBALLS OF BOUGAINVILLE by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Classic Leyner insanity, a delight for his fans but unlikely to win any new ones."
The poet laureate of the MTV generation (Tooth Imprints on a Corn Dog, 1995, etc.) tries to spread his wings wider with his "first 100 percent BONA FIDE NOVEL—story, characters, everything!'' Read full book review >
TOOTH IMPRINTS ON A CORN DOG by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1995

After the loopy pyrotechnics of My Cousin, My Gastroenterologist (1991) and the gleeful dissection of celebrity in Et Tu, Babe (1992), what's left for postmodern Savoyard Leyner to do but shelve stories and novels and turn to the theater? That's what he does, sort of, in this new collection of pieces, many of which previously appeared in such magazines as the New Yorker and Esquire Gentleman. Inserting Mark, his manic fictional doppelgÑnger, into the surreal dramaturgy, Leyner concocts a range of scenarios to explore shopping, anti-Semitism, parenting, fame, poetry, and dates with English royalty. In ``Young Bergdorf Goodman Brown,'' Leyner updates Hawthorne's ``Young Goodman Brown'' by sending Mark through the Manhattan department store's vast network of sub-basements in search of an Armani pocketbook for his daughter's Haute Barbie; before it's over, he's unearthed a 40-year-old military collusion between Israel and a race of extraterrestrials (``the Protocols of the Elders of Zion as rewritten by Whitley Strieber''). For stories not set up like plays, Leyner offers advice to sartorially challenged bodybuilders (``Hulk Couture''), discusses secret Senate tattooing rituals (``The [Illustrated] Body Politic''), suggests more rigorous standards for the selection of Miss America (``Dream Girls, USA''), recommends ways for tenderfoot fathers to retain their masculinity while using their newborns as martial-arts weapons (``Dangerous Dads''), and proposes a means of sneaking product placements into the great books (``Eat at Cosmo's''). But it's the account of writing a 1000-line poem for a German periodical while holed up in Hollywood's Chateau Marmont (``The Making of Tooth Imprints on a Corn Dog'') that really stops the show; here Mark composes ``the gorgeous cadenzas I whistle as I clean the Augean stables of contemporary literature.'' Others imitate Leyner's zany style, but none wield it as skillfully. Or with such maturity. (Author tour) Read full book review >
ET TU, BABE by Mark Leyner
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 6, 1992

"When Saturday Night Live loses its luster, open this book. Open it anywhere."
Leyner's follow-up to My Cousin, My Gastroenterologist (1990), which achieved a kind of cult status, is both less and more: Once again it's a pop-culture collage with Leyner at center stage doing a series of stand-up routines, but it's also like a pimple that Leyner decided to show off simply because it appeared on his face. Read full book review >