Books by Nate Evans

COOKIESAURUS CHRISTMAS by Amy Fellner Dominy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 4, 2018

"For kids who like to have a little rambunctious, sloppy fun with their Christmas baking. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A table full of cookie cutters and an empty plate for Santa, seen from above, set the stage for the return of Cookiesaurus Rex after his eponymous debut (2017). Read full book review >
TYRANNOSAURUS RALPH by Nate Evans
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2017

"Readers in search of unalloyed wish fulfillment thickly layered with melodramatic posturing and gore-free, comics-style violence need look no further. (Graphic fantasy/science fiction. 10-12)"
A bullying victim saves Earth after his brain is transferred into the body of a T. Rex. Read full book review >
COOKIESAURUS REX by Amy Fellner Dominy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"Have cookie dough and frosting ready, as kids are sure to want to try their own hands at decorating after a few laugh-filled rereads. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A dinosaur-shaped cookie takes matters—and frosting—into his own doughy hands. Read full book review >
THE JELLYBEANS LOVE TO READ by Laura Numeroff
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"Stick with the original picture book for a simple treatise on the power of literature. (Board book. 3-5)"
A gang of four friends, each a different animal, finds books to enjoy at their local library. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Pure pleasure for children addicted to dinos, the delights of big trucks and decoding visual jumbles. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A teeming dino crew in hard hats and safety vests create organized if frenetic chaos on a mucky construction site in this alpha-romp. Read full book review >
THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG CAMP KICKOFF by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

Those colorful Jellybeans bring their pep and playfulness to the great outdoors (The Jellybeans and the Big Book Bonanza, 2010, etc.). Emily (a dog) loves to dance, Anna (a rabbit) loves to read, Bitsy (a pig) loves arts and crafts and Nicole (a cat) loves soccer. Nicole, in fact, is something of a fanatic, even balancing the ball on one paw as she sleeps. The perfect place for all four girls to indulge in their passions, as well as learn about some new ones, is at Camp Pook-A-Wow. Most of the girls find their favorite pastimes there, and there's also swimming and hiking and toasting marshmallows together around a campfire. But Nicole is disappointed that soccer is not among the activities offered; she tries tennis, gymnastics and kayaking, but none of these sports goes very well for her. Thank goodness for friends and for camp counselor Mrs. Jangley-Cheezer (a tall wolf in a bright yellow uniform), who helps organize a soccer team. All the Jellybeans work together to make it a success. "Hooray for us!" The tale unfolds with warmth and reassuring humor, and Numeroff and Evans include all the relevant camp activities, making this latest Jellybeans adventure a good primer for young would-be campers. Munsinger's watercolor illustrations are bright and suggest vigor and happiness, like the Jellybeans themselves. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
MEET THE BEAST by Nate Evans
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

Nine-year-old Zeke's father sends a care package to Zeke and his younger sister Hannah from an aircraft carrier in the Bermuda Triangle. When the package arrives and the kids bust it open fighting over it, candy wrappers flutter out—but no candy. Soon strange things begin to happen around the house: Snacks disappear, odd voices grumble in Zeke's room, sneakers and dolls vanish. Zeke and Hannah mount a monster hunt and FIND ONE! Beast is a tiny magical refugee from Triangle Island, which is currently ruled by evil trolls. He has the tricksy magic of "swap-o." For a short time, he can swap items from there (Triangle Island) to here. Zeke and Hannah find that can cause trouble, but it can also solve bully problems. Illustrator Nate Evans collaborates with his younger brother Vince for this wide-eyed kickoff to a new series for the chapter-book crowd. Fast action scenes switch to graphic format, and all of the copious black-and-white illustrations resemble cleaned-up MAD magazine comics with more goggling eyes. Good for a few goofy laughs. (Fiction. 6-9)Read full book review >
THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG BOOK BONANZA by Laura Numeroff
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

No matter what your passion, there's a book written just for you. Anna, a young gray rabbit, loves to read and takes a book with her wherever she goes. Her friends, though, have many different interests. Emily (a terrier) loves to dance, Nicole (a cat) loves to play soccer and Bitsy (a pig) loves to paint. They call themselves the Jellybeans, with a nod to their diversity and named after their favorite candy. When the homework assignment involves a class trip to the library to select materials for a book report, Anna is excited, but the rest of the Jellybeans are wary of this unfamiliar place. After a bit of resistance, librarian Ms. Beasley-Buzzer (a plump and motherly goose) leads each child to the perfect read, based on his/her interests. When book-report time comes, the Jellybeans stand hand in hand in front of the class, sharing their love of reading. Munsinger's watercolors depict the characters with maximum cuteness; Numeroff and co-author Evan's story is similarly warm and simple—if also unabashedly didactic. (Picture book. 3-6)Read full book review >
THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG DANCE by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

Four disparate students plus one dance recital add up to a bundle of trouble in this collaborative effort from Evans and Numeroff. When dance enthusiast Emily meets her fellow classmates, she despairs of them ever performing together. A soccer player, a budding artist and a retiring bookworm, Nicole, Bitsy and Anna are equally perplexed by Emily's fervent love of dancing. However, a visit to her favorite candy shop provides the inspiration Emily needs to foster an esprit de corps among the unlikely foursome. Using a bag of different flavored jelly beans as an analogy for the distinctly unique but complimentary talents each girl can contribute to the recital, Emily encourages the girls to work together. Munsinger's cheerful pastel watercolors feature a cast of typically adorable characters, whose widespread interests holds appeal to a broad audience. This timely tale of forging connections despite seemingly insurmountable differences provides a light-hearted look at the power of cooperative action. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
SHERMAN CRUNCHLEY by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

Sherman learns how to be his own dog in a tale that revolves around the ability—or, in Sherman's case, inability—to say no. Though Sherman doesn't like police work, force of tradition—long family tradition—is about to land him the chief's job. He can't say no and disappoint his father; in truth, Sherman—drawn as an insecure but sweet pooch in Bowers's ingratiating artwork—can't say no to anyone. Now, hats—well, Sherman can't say no to hats, either, but that's because he likes them so much. After a series of goofy self-help schemes fails to give voice to Sherman's inner "no," he decides to let his hats speak for him. Such a little word to create such anxiety, though the authors' point will not be lost on young readers: if you say no, the house will not fall down and family and friends will not flee; this time, the negative has positive potential. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >