Books by Ned Vizzini

CLASH OF THE WORLDS by Chris Columbus
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 3, 2016

"Generally, an enjoyable book with high stakes and a solid ending, despite the mushy middle. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Following the 2013 death of co-author Vizzini, Rylander joins the team for the conclusion to the book-world-hopping House of Secrets series. Read full book review >
BATTLE OF THE BEASTS by Chris Columbus
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 25, 2014

"A dark action-adventure-fantasy with surprising heart. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
House of Secrets' (2013) happy ending gives way to new problems for the Walker children, both in reality and in writer-wizard Denver Kristoff's pulpy genre-book worlds. Read full book review >
HOUSE OF SECRETS by Chris Columbus
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 23, 2013

"Ending with the promise (or threat) of further adventures, this is clearly intended to be the next big thing—whether it fulfills that ambition remains to be seen. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Columbus and Vizzini craft a fast-moving, cinematic narrative that packs plenty of punch but may still have trouble measuring up to the competition. Read full book review >
THE OTHER NORMALS by Ned Vizzini
Released: Sept. 25, 2012

"Great geeky fun. (Fantasy. 13 & up)"
A shy role-playing-game aficionado finds slaying monsters easier than kissing a girl in this appealing adventure by the author of It's Kind of a Funny Story (2006). Read full book review >
IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY by Ned Vizzini
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2006

"For the readers who stick with him until the end, the results will resonate with them just as loudly as Craig's newfound credo: to live for real. (Fiction. YA)"
Craig Gilner, a high-school student in New York City, can't deal with his grades, keep food in his stomach or prevent himself from feeling disconnected from his friends and family. Read full book review >
BE MORE CHILL by Ned Vizzini
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2004

"An interesting if unwieldy premise technologically, but diluted by the lack of character growth. (Science fiction. YA)"
A self-centered teenager swallows a supercomputer to make himself cool in this strangely amoral piece. Read full book review >