Books by Noah Hawley

BEFORE THE FALL by Noah Hawley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 2016

"Like the successful screenwriter that he is, Hawley piles on enough intrigues and plot complications to keep you hooked even if you can spot most of them a sea mile away."
In the latest by TV writer and novelist Hawley (The Good Father, 2012, etc.), a struggling artist becomes a hero twice—first by saving a young boy's life, then by outsmarting the anchor of a Fox-like conservative TV network. Read full book review >
THE GOOD FATHER by Noah Hawley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 20, 2012

"The novel ultimately becomes as much about a father's quest for meaning and understanding as about a son's political and social alienation—and Hawley delivers on the complex psychology of father-son relationships."
Dr. Paul Allen is at least trying to be a good father, though perhaps he crosses the line into paranoia when his son Daniel is arrested for assassinating Senator Jay Seagram, a promising presidential candidate. Read full book review >
THE PUNCH by Noah Hawley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2008

"Brotherly love never hurt so good."
The messy realities of life and death intrude on a family's deeply held rationalizations. Read full book review >
OTHER PEOPLE’S WEDDINGS by Noah Hawley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2004

"Amusing—but 400 pages of chat is too much. Even the big tragic scene that accounts for Laurie's character feels lost in the swash. Too many subplots, Mozart!"
Second outing by the author of the comic paranoid thriller A Conspiracy of Tall Men (1998). Read full book review >
A CONSPIRACY OF TALL MEN by Noah Hawley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 8, 1998

"A debut thriller with storytelling grip."
A paranoid's delight: In middle life and still followed about by a cloud of foreboding, Linus Owens is a professor of conspiracy theory who is himself wrapped tight in an infinite cat's cradle of suspicions about large-sum currency, cellular phones, faxes, large screen TVs, multiple CD changers, electronic organizers, the terrifying sound of his own wife, Claudia, steaming milk in their espresso machine. Read full book review >