Books by Norton Juster

NEVILLE by Norton Juster
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 25, 2011

"A fine treatment of a tried-and-true theme. (Picture book 4-6)"
A little boy, bereft over moving, makes strides toward feeling at home in his new neighborhood. Read full book review >
THE ANNOTATED PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH by Norton Juster
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 25, 2011

"A timeless tribute to learning as play, much enriched with background on even the (seemingly) throwaway lines and puns. (Literary criticism. 10-12, adult)"
Still ferrying dazzled readers to Dictionopolis and beyond 50 years after his first appearance, young Milo is accompanied this time through by encyclopedic commentary from our generation's leading (and most readable) expert on the history of children's literature and publishing. Read full book review >
THE ODIOUS OGRE by Norton Juster
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

Move over, Shrek, there's a new ogre in the picture-book section. Read full book review >

SOURPUSS AND SWEETIE PIE by Norton Juster
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

The ingenuous little girl from the Caldecott Medal-winning The Hello, Goodbye Window (2005) is back, exploring the split personality that causes her loving grandparents to give her two very different names. Read full book review >

THE HELLO, GOODBYE WINDOW by Norton Juster
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2005

On the title page, a little girl springs away from her parents; turn the page, and the reader sees only her arms on the gate, the reader taking her perspective as she looks over to the white clapboard house where her Nanna and Poppy's faces stare equally eagerly out of the Hello, Goodbye Window. Read full book review >

ALBERIC THE WISE by Norton Juster
FICTION
Released: Nov. 20, 1992

A leisurely, philosophical tale that first appeared as the title story in a 1965 collection. Read full book review >

AS: A Surfeit of Similes by Norton Juster
Released: March 24, 1989

The author of The Phantom Tollbooth (1961) returns with a delightful, and exhaustive, exploration of smiles: explicit comparisons that "reveal the. . .essence of whatever we want to describe. . .to enlarge our understanding or perception of human experience and observation." Read full book review >