Books by Obert Skye

APPRENTICE NEEDED by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 2, 2019

"A sequel that (mostly) continues to deliver mystery, humor, and real-life magic. (Fantasy. 12-14) "
Fifteen-year-old Ozzy Toffy is still settling into his new life beyond the solitary house in the woods when a series of events puts everything and everyone he loves in jeopardy in this sequel to Wizard for Hire (2018). Read full book review >
WIZARD FOR HIRE by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 6, 2018

"A stand-alone standout for fans of Leven Thumps. (Fantasy. 10-13)"
After his parents are abducted from their secluded forest home, a young boy survives alone on canned goods and the stories he finds in books. Read full book review >
MUTANT BUNNY ISLAND by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 7, 2017

"The story is always fast-paced and imaginative, but maybe it's a little too imaginative. Skeptics may prefer something a bit more grounded. (Humorous fantasy. 8-12)"
There's a long, proud history of nonsense books, which includes Lewis Carroll and Dr. Seuss. But this novel makes less sense than most. Read full book review >
LOST AND FOUND by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2016

"Another suspenseful romp for kids who like dark humor. (Adventure. 9-14)"
The Snicket-ian dark comedy continues in Volume 2 of this series about a brother and sister trapped in the awful Witherwood Reform School. Read full book review >
WITHERWOOD REFORM SCHOOL by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 3, 2015

"One can almost hear the Tim Curry narration. (Adventure. 9-12)"
A brother and sister find themselves trapped in a frightening school that threatens to destroy their minds in this dark comedy. Read full book review >
PINOCULA by Obert Skye
by Obert Skye, illustrated by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"Neither Rob's guilt pangs nor Pinocula's near reversion to wood add much force to the superficial anti-lying message, and the premise, third time through, has gone as stale as the jokes. (Fantasy. 9-11)"
Occasional yuks and hints of an overarching plotline at the end aren't enough to keep this phoned-in entry in a Wimpy Kid-knockoff series above ground. Read full book review >
POTTERWOOKIEE by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 18, 2012

"Maybe the next episode will be less derivative. There's always hope. (Comic fantasy. 9-11)"
The second doll-sized literary mashup to come out of a wimpy kid's magic closet (see Wonkenstein, 2011) adds wizardly spells and, far more frequently, noxious smells to a standard catalog of preteen misadventures. Read full book review >
WONKENSTEIN by Obert Skye
by Obert Skye, illustrated by Obert Skye
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2011

"Likely to be lost in the crowd, but comfy antics for readers who don't probably much like reading—which, one thinks, is exactly the point. (Fantasy. 9-11)"
Skye adds another Wimpy Kid to the growing bandwagon. Read full book review >
LEVEN THUMPS AND THE EYES OF THE WANT by Obert Skye
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 25, 2007

"The ingenious twists and distinctive prose that animated the opener have turned into self-indulgence. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
Skye continues to squander the promise of Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo (2005) in this third of a projected four volumes. Read full book review >
LEVEN THUMPS AND THE WHISPERED SECRET by Obert Skye
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"Frequent full-page illustrations not seen. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
In a severe case of middle-volume-itis, plot lines proliferate, the pace slows and the tale is left in mid-flight in this follow-up to the better-than-it-looked Leven Thumps and the Gateway to Foo (2005). Read full book review >
LEVEN THUMPS AND THE GATEWAY TO FOO by Obert Skye
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 1, 2005

"Good enough to survive a truly dreadful cover illustration, this recalls Michael Chabon's Summerland (2002) for its mix of humor and terror, its splendidly unpredictable plot twists, and its intriguing vision of a reality that is wider than most of us suspect. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
A fizzy blend of high and low fantasy with a distinctly American sensibility, this series kickoff pits a seemingly ordinary Oklahoma teen against a deranged dream master bent on conquering both Earth and the unfortunately named realm of Foo—the metaphysical stage upon which our day and night dreams all play. Read full book review >