Books by Pamela Hill

THE SMALL BLACK KNIFE by Pamela Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 1999

"Though veteran Hill (The Sword and the Flame, 1992, etc.) takes her time getting around to that small black knife, readers who stay the course will be rewarded with a cunningly intricate human puzzle."
Months after retired economist Julius Partridge tumbles to his death from a stone ledge near his cottage in the village of Brennan, Tom Brackenbury, a journalist grieving for the wife he lost to an IRA bombing, arrives in Brennan to find his sodden, sluttish widow at the center of the village's social life. Read full book review >
THE SWORD AND THE FLAME by Pamela Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 11, 1992

By the author of many, many historical novels (and also grim little sagas of concentrated familial nastiness like Vollands, p. 625): a view of the strenuous career of Marie de Guise of France, mother of Mary, Queen of Scots, born in 1587, six days before the death of her father, James V. The fictional narrator here is Claudine de Vouvray, resilient and feisty, who is happy to accompany her beloved half-sister Marie de Guise (neither illegitimate Claudine nor Marie ever publicly acknowledges the relationship) to Scotland, where the widowed Marie will be the queen of James V, the dangerously volatile victim of a punishing childhood. Read full book review >
THE BROCKEN by Pamela Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 24, 1991

"Hill's in top form in this 19th-century family grotesque—as neat and slyly wicked as a Gorey illustration."
Another of Hill's acidulous little gems featuring serenely horrid people, victims who either drop passively from the twisted family tree, or hurtle down spitting, along with blackly comic turns of fortune fueled by monstrous acts. Read full book review >
VOLLANDS by Pamela Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 23, 1991

"Hill's audience is assured."
Like Hill's The Sutburys (1989), another bleak saga, smoothly narrated, of another 19th-century family of English gentry—which implodes over the years because of circumstance, cruelty, and general nastiness. Read full book review >