Books by Pamela Mayer

CHICKEN SOUP, CHICKEN SOUP by Pamela Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2016

"The story may a little obvious, but the good feelings (and good tastes) that it brings to mind are cooked just right for families like Sophie's—and everyone else—to enjoy. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Lucky is the child who gets to savor two different kinds of chicken soup made by her two grandmothers. Read full book review >
DON'T SNEEZE AT THE WEDDING by Pamela Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"The punch line is still funny. Anna manages to keep her sneeze hidden from the wedding guests. But readers may feel they've had twice as much story as they really needed. (author's note) (Picture book. 5-9)"
This is two books in one, but it's not as much of a bargain as it sounds like. Read full book review >
THE GRANDMA CURE by Pamela Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

Squabbling grandmothers remind sick-in-bed Becky of her kindergarten classmates. Young Becky catches a cold and her two grandmothers come to the rescue, Sophie on the first day with orange juice and chicken soup, and Rosalie on the second with tea and rice pudding. But on the third day of Becky's convalescence, both grandmas show up and competitive chaos ensues. As they jockey for position and nurturing points, the grandmas' behavior triggers classroom memories for Becky. Her teacher Ms. Chu has taught her to take turns and share. Becky passes these lessons along and by the afternoon, everyone is playing together harmoniously, including the fluffy cat. Busy illustrations—made with paint, the computer and a light box—add color and wry humor to the story. A middling story with a gentle lesson, though a bit too sophisticated for the low end of its target audience. (Picture book. 3-5)Read full book review >
THE SCARIEST MONSTER IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD by Pamela Mayer
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2001

Thea Dewhickey's parents might be a couple of potato-heads, but they are also overachievers of the worst type: They overachieve for their daughter. Young Thea wants to be a scary monster for Halloween, with "claws and fangs and green scales and blood dripping off the corners of my mouth, and maybe even an ax coming out of my head" . . . that sort of thing. The Dewhickeys, angling for first prize at the costume parade, think she ought to be a butterfly, or perhaps a Spanish dancer. But Thea wards off their importuning until her Grandma arrives on the scene to take things in hand. Thea gets her scary costume, and Mr. and Mrs. Dewhickey get to be, respectively, a Spanish dancer and a butterfly. They even win honorable mentions. Though the self-serving parents get hoisted on their own petards, Mayer keeps a poker-face on the narrative—"The judges thought the butterfly costume Grandma made for Mrs. Dewhickey was dreamy . . . Thea was so proud"—so it never feels obvious or punishing. On the other hand, Monks's artwork, of paint and collage, is comic relief of the highest sort, with great clunky shapes, electric colors, and wide expressive eyes. Leave it to the always-witty Monks to make Grandma a witch with skeleton earrings, purple purse, and pointy hat (a fact never mentioned in the text). Will appeal to monsters everywhere. (Picture book. 3-7)Read full book review >