Books by Patrice Vecchione

FAITH AND DOUBT by Patrice Vecchione
POETRY
Released: April 1, 2007

For her intelligent anthology, Vecchione has chosen poems—the longest of them barely three pages and most only one page—that address questions of faith and its mirror shadow, doubt, in the broadest possible manner. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: April 1, 2004

"Extensive comments, biographies, and reading lists from each poet round out this first-choice anthology for today's teens. (Nonfiction. 12 )"
The editor of engaging poetry anthologies for young adults, Vecchione has produced an accessible, stimulating, and timely collection. Read full book review >
POETRY
Released: May 1, 2001

"The hook will lure teens in; the poetry will make them stay. (biographical notes with bibliography) (Poetry. YA)"
An anthology usually stands or falls on the strength of its theme and the perspicacity of its editor's choices: this one mostly stands. Read full book review >
WHISPER AND SHOUT by Patrice Vecchione
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"A keeper. (Poetry. 9-12)"
Vecchione follows her very successful anthology Truth and Lies (2000) with a smart collection of poetry for slightly younger readers. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"An excellent anthology that should resonate with the teenaged reader. (Poetry. 12+)"
More than 50 poets representing world literature from the ancient Greek Sappho to the contemporary Latina poet Julia Alvarez speak about two common themes that transcend time and culture. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"Recovering or practicing Catholics will experience a tingle of recognition; general readers should enjoy the consistent level of craftsmanship and emotional honesty."
Poignant, funny, and reflective fictional recollections of Catholic childhoods, assembled by the editors of Catholic Girls (1992). Read full book review >
CATHOLIC GIRLS by Amber Coverdale Sumrall
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 29, 1992

"Perhaps—but this anthology will provoke more yawns than yelps."
Not, as the title suggests, about Catholic girlhood per se, but rather about girls and young women who rebel against their religious upbringing. Read full book review >