Books by Paul McAuley

COWBOY ANGELS by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"Not McAuley's best, but exciting enough to keep the thriller crowd on board."
Alternate-reality sci-fi thriller from the underrated author of Gardens of the Sun (2010), which first appeared in Britain in 2007. Read full book review >
WHITE DEVILS by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Apart from the tough-slog present-tense narrative and sheer density of detail: McAuley's heart-of-darkness is as bleak, scarifying, persuasive, and terrible as it gets."
Near-future biological horror from the talented, versatile British author of Whole Wide World (2002), etc. Read full book review >
THE SECRET OF LIFE by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2001

"Spectacular ideas, life-sized characters, credible and provocative politicking and maneuvering: a pity, then, about the present-tense narrative, which intrusively smothers any developing sense of drama."
Near-future biological thriller from the author of the dazzling far-future Confluence trilogy (completed with Shrine of Stars, 2000), etc. In 2026, a huge invasive biological growth, the Slick, floats in the Pacific Ocean. Read full book review >
WHOLE WIDE WORLD by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 1, 2001

"A rare combination of soft-boiled hero, gut-churning crime, official puritanism, and commercial arrogance, whose chilling, all-too-believable backdrop will be instantly recognized by anyone familiar with the UK's already prevalent CCTV schemes."
Near-future police thriller from the author of such significant SF yarns as The Secret of Life (2001) and the far-future Confluence Trilogy. Read full book review >
CHILD OF THE RIVER by Paul McAuley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: June 5, 1998

"Agreeably meaty and complex, challenging and tantalizing: an entry with ample scope for sequels, the one possible drawback being that McAuley's (Pasquale's Angel, 1995, etc.) narrative voice may be too cool to be entirely satisfying."
Thousands of years ago, so we eventually learn, the omnipotent and now-vanished Preservers built Confluence, not a planet but a habitat, or construct, that's home to a zillion species—"bloodlines"—whose ancestry includes both human and animal genes. Read full book review >