Books by Paula McLain

LOVE AND RUIN by Paula McLain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2018

"This elegant if oddly bloodless narrative is a good introduction for those who know nothing of Gellhorn, but it basically rehashes information and sentiments already available in that writer's own memoir and published letters."
Having focused on Ernest Hemingway's first wife, Hadley Richardson, in The Paris Wife (2011), McLain now turns to his third, writer Martha Gellhorn. Read full book review >
CIRCLING THE SUN by Paula McLain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 28, 2015

"Ernest Hemingway, who met Markham on safari two years before her Atlantic crossing, tagged her as 'a high-grade bitch' but proclaimed her 1942 memoir West with the Night 'bloody wonderful.' Readers might even say the same of McLain's sparkling prose and sympathetic reimagining."
A full-throttle dive into the psyche and romantic attachments of Beryl Markham—whose 1936 solo flight across the Atlantic in a two-seater prop plane (carrying emergency fuel in the extra seat) transfixed the world. Read full book review >
THE PARIS WIFE by Paula McLain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 8, 2011

"A pleasure to read—and a pleasure to see Hadley Richardson presented in a sympathetic light."
An imaginative, elegantly written look inside the marriage of Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Richardson. Read full book review >
A TICKET TO RIDE by Paula McLain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 8, 2008

"Strange brew."
In this first novel from memoirist and poet McLain (Like Family: Growing Up in Other People's Houses, 2003, etc.), a naïve Midwestern teen gets a visit from her sly, sexy cousin, and trouble ensues. Read full book review >
LIKE FAMILY by Paula McLain
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 18, 2003

"Not a foster-care horror story exactly, but a thoughtful recalling of the emotional toll a life of uncertainty can take."
An unsentimental and thus telling memoir by the middle of three sisters who grew up in a series of foster homes in Fresno, California. Read full book review >