Books by Pauline Melville

THE MIGRATION OF GHOSTS by Pauline Melville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 1999

"An irresistible book and a fine introduction, for those who need one, to one of the best new writers on the international scene."
Twelve colorful and intriguingly exotic stories from the British-Guyanese author of Shape-Shifter (a first collection, 1991) and the highly praised novel The Ventriloquist's Tale (1998). Read full book review >
THE VENTRILOQUIST'S TALE by Pauline Melville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 1998

"Melville's wise and artful fiction suggests, in Rosa's fate, some of the ways the West and the larger world, as well as myth and the mundane, might find common ground Rich, penetrating, idiosyncratic work from a new, uniquely gifted storyteller."
"All stories are told for revenge or tribute," says the unnamed narrator here. Read full book review >
SHAPE-SHIFTER by Pauline Melville
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 1991

"A promising debut: Melville's transatlantic stories, in particular, capture the conflict between the exotic and the ordinary."
A first collection of 12 stories (winner of the Guardian Prize in England) that shifts intelligently between London, Guyana, and the Caribbean: very good on local patois and custom, as well as dramatizing a sense of dislocation and a yearning for home. ``Eat Labba and Drink Creek Water,'' a series of instances on ocean-hopping juxtaposed to variations on the myths of El Dorado, most explicitly voices this mood: ``We do return and leave and return again, criss-crossing the Atlantic, but whichever side of the Atlantic we are on, the dream is always on the other side.'' In ``A Disguised Land,'' a woman in England from Jamaica for an unhappy reunion with her mother kites checks and goes on the dole in order to feed her kids, then gets a jail term while pregnant and, after delivering the baby, escapes with it, only to return to the jail with a TV crew—having made an adjustment of sorts to her new home. Read full book review >