Books by Pete Hamill

Pete Hamill was born in Brooklyn, N. Y. in 1935. He is the oldest of seven children of Irish immigrants from Belfast, Northern Ireland and attended Catholic schools as a child. He left school at 16 to work in the Brooklyn Navy Yard as a sheetmetal worker,


THE CHRISTMAS KID by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 30, 2012

"Lost treasures from a time gone by, brimming with affection for old New York."
Little slices of decades-old melancholy from Hamill (Tabloid City, 2011, etc.). Read full book review >
TABLOID CITY by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2011

"A wasted opportunity to memorialize the tabloids through fiction."
The veteran newspaperman and novelist (North River, 2007, etc.) couples a lament for a dying tabloid culture with a cockamamie plot about the murderous rampage of a jihadist; it doesn't work. Read full book review >
NORTH RIVER by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 2007

"Hamill the realist prevails (mostly) over the sentimentalist in this above-average entertainment. "
Hamill (Forever, 2002, etc.) returns with a gritty Depression-era story about a grief-stricken doctor rejuvenated by an unwelcome challenge: raising his small grandson. Read full book review >
DOWNTOWN by Pete Hamill
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 2004

"A finely etched and hand-colored portrait from one of those rare reporters who has lived long and hard in his beat. "
Manhattan south of 42nd Street (with a handful of excursions north), rendered in all its delirious human evidence by veteran newsman Hamill (Forever, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >
FOREVER by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 30, 2002

"A true Hamill piece: by turns fascinating, sentimental, hackneyed, and provincial in the best New York mode. It won't play in Poughkeepsie, but there are plenty of New Yorkers (and New York-ophiles) who will love it."
Journalist and author Hamill (the novel Loving Women, 1989; Why Sinatra Matters, 1998, etc.) offers a chronicle of 250 years of Manhattan life as experienced by an immortal Irish immigrant. Read full book review >
WHY SINATRA MATTERS by Pete Hamill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

What a perfect match: the world's greatest "saloon singer" eulogized superbly by the author of The Drinking Life (1993). Read full book review >

SNOW IN AUGUST by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 7, 1997

The eighth novel by New York journalist/now New York Post editor Hamill (Loving Women, 1989; the memoir A Drinking Life, 1994, etc.) finds him as readable as ever. In postwar working-class Brooklyn, Irish Catholic Michael Devlin, 11, is obsessed with comics, worships Captain Marvel, and wonders why shouting SHAZAM! doesn't turn him into a superhero. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 17, 1996

This exemplary collection of journalism is fueled by a powerful nostalgia for a New York—and a world—that once was. Hamill (A Drinking Life, 1994, etc.) here gathers pieces that originally appeared in outlets like New York magazine, the Village Voice, and Esquire. Read full book review >

THE DRINKING LIFE by Pete Hamill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 19, 1994

Earnest memoir of Hamill's drinking days as a Brooklyn youth and young reporter. Now sober 20 years, Hamill (Tokyo Sketches, 1992, etc.) looks back on his family life in Brooklyn during the Depression and WW II, when his father Billy's drinking became a model for his own liquid career, despite a vow not to follow in dad's footsteps. Read full book review >

TOKYO SKETCHES by Pete Hamill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1993

Thirteen stories by veteran Gothamite Hamill (Loving Women, 1989, etc.) about clashes between Japanese and American culture. Read full book review >

LOVING WOMEN by Pete Hamill
Released: April 3, 1989

Compulsively readable but unabashedly romantic flight of autobiographical fancy (coming-of-age as a naval recruit in 1953 Florida) from the popular newspaper columnist and author (Flesh & Blood, 1977; The Invisible City: A New York Sketchbook, 1980; etc.). Read full book review >