Books by Richard Wormser

AMERICAN CHILDHOODS by Richard Wormser
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"In this comparison of past and present, readers are left with a ball of complexities that they will be unable to unravel beyond a sad thread of statistics and hardship. (index, not seen, b&w photos, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 10+)"
The idyllic title is immediately offset by the subtitle- -``Three Centuries of Youth at Risk''—of this book, in which Wormser (Juveniles In Trouble, 1994, etc.) asks, ``Were children happier growing up in the past?'' His answer is both yes and no, as he reports that the ``good old days'' were full of hazards for children of the past that are unthinkable today. Read full book review >
JUVENILES IN TROUBLE by Richard Wormser
NONFICTION
Released: June 1, 1994

"Photos (not seen); bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
A well-known haven for runaways and delinquents, New York's sometimes controversial Covenant House, is the centerpiece of this morality play. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: May 2, 1994

"Glossary; bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
An engaging account of the penurious workers who crisscrossed America as ``internal refugees'' from the Industrial Revolution. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"B&w photos; brief bibliography including juvenile titles; index (not seen). (Nonfiction. 11+)"
An engrossing, highly readable account of the social and political issues surrounding the development of railroads in the US. Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 1991

A hard-edged look at prison through the eyes of the Lifers' Group, men serving life sentences at the East Jersey State Prison who have dedicated themselves to reaching troubled teenagers. Read full book review >
PINKERTON by Richard Wormser
Released: Oct. 25, 1990

Born in a Glasgow slum, Allan Pinkerton left Scotland as a wanted man (he'd joined a Chartist demonstration for political reform); was a fervent abolitionist, a friend Of John Brown's and a participant in the Underground Railway; yet he ended his innovative career supporting industrial bosses against labor (e.g., against the Irish coal-miners' terrorist organization, the Molly Maguires). Read full book review >