Books by Robert E. Margroff

Released: Aug. 1, 1992

Fifth and concluding volume of the series (most recently Orc's Opal) about Kelvin of Rud, the Roundear of Prophesy, and the magical tussle between the good (and mostly offstage) wizard Mouvar and the evil Professor Devale. The latter and his sidekick, the malignant witch Zady, will make one final attempt to destroy Kelvin and his allies, and prevent the fulfillment of the prophecy that will unite all the lands under one benevolent ruler. At first Zady seems to gain the upper hand, ensorcelling Kelvin, kidnapping various of Kelvin's telepathic children, bamboozling Kelvin's other offspring, the human-dragon Horace. But gradually, as the powerfully magical orcs perceive the threat and join the battle, a balance is struck. Finally, with the help of the three-headed chimera, Kelvin defeats Zady and Devale, and Mover pops up to tell Kelvin that the whole exercise was a sort of game between himself and Devale. Understandably, Kelvin is not thrilled at the news. Loads of improbable action, a frenetic pace, monsters and magics galore, and no claim to seriousness: precisely the formula that has succeeded throughout the series, and a satisfying finale for the fans. Read full book review >
ORC'S OPAL by Piers Anthony
Released: Dec. 20, 1990

Fourth in the series, following Chimaera's Copper (p. 616), featuring Kelvin the Roundear's fun-filled family adventures in various magical "frames" as the wizard Mouvar's Prophesy moves toward completion—despite the frothy complications introduced by the contending good and evil characters. Six years have passed; Kelvin's children, Charles and Merlain, are telepathic, while Dragon Horace has grown faster but refuses to acquire human speech. The evil old witch Zady plots to destroy Kelvin and family by secretly bewitching the children during their visit to a Wizard's Convention (in a parallel New York, no less) and so provoking a war with the giant green fishlike Orcs over their Opal, a precious gem that can transport the bearer instantaneously from frame to frame. Guess who comes out on top. A concluding volume is promised for fans who, nothing loath, continue to discover fresh pleasures in Anthony's trite teen-age formulas. Read full book review >
ORC'S OPAL by Piers Anthony
Released: Dec. 20, 1990

Fourth in the series, following Chimaera's Copper (p. 616), featuring Kelvin the Roundear's fun-filled family adventures in various magical "frames" as the wizard Mouvar's Prophesy moves toward completion—despite the frothy complications introduced by the contending good and evil characters. Six years have passed; Kelvin's children, Charles and Merlain, are telepathic, while Dragon Horace has grown faster but refuses to acquire human speech. The evil old witch Zady plots to destroy Kelvin and family by secretly bewitching the children during their visit to a Wizard's Convention (in a parallel New York, no less) and so provoking a war with the giant green fishlike Orcs over their Opal, a precious gem that can transport the bearer instantaneously from frame to frame. Guess who comes out on top. A concluding volume is promised for fans who, nothing loath, continue to discover fresh pleasures in Anthony's trite teen-age formulas. Read full book review >
CHIMAERA'S COPPER by Piers Anthony
NONFICTION
Released: May 21, 1990

Third in a series that began with Dragon's Gold and Serpent's Silver, featuring a prophecy, a young hero, and several parallel magical worlds—in short, the familiar Anthony formula. Kelvin Knight Hackleberry (our hero), along with his half-brother and their father, takes a transporter trip that ends up on the wrong parallel world, where they are instantly captured by the froglike locals and turned over to the man-eating Chimaera. Meanwhile, good King Rufert has been banished by the wicked sorceress Zoanna and replaced by King Rowforth, who looks exactly like him except for the shape of his ears (the only way to tell natives of different "planes" apart). Can Kelvin escape the Chimaera in time to stop evil Rowforth from conquering the world? Given the lifeless writing, and a pack of banal characters who invariably do something stupid at a crucial point in the story, not many readers are likely to care. A very flat performance; the ending promises at least one more installment. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 10, 1988

Sequel to Dragon's Gold (not seen), more sponge-brained magical doings involving various nearby "frames" or paralled worlds. Sound familiar? It should—Anthony's been working the same vein for more than two decades. Young Kelvin of Rud—he has round ears, in a world of pointy-earred characters—has fulfilled the first part pf of a hero-prophesy almost by accident. Now he must enter an adjacent frame in order to rescue his Earth-derived father John from the evil, ambitious Rowforth's unpleasant dungeons. In this frame, instead of gold-skinned dragons, they have silver-skinned, rock-chewing giant worms, along with humanoid serpent people—the worms' remote kin—magical types who can freeze humans with a glance. One subplot features Kian, Kelvin's brother, who ends up in the dungeons with John; another involves Kelvin's wife and her obnoxious father. Magic is provided by the vanished travelling sorcerer Mouvar, whose mysterious devices help Kelvin win the day—and fulfill part two of the prophesy. Juvenile gush. Read full book review >