Books by Robert Lee Hall

LONDON BLOOD by Robert Lee Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1997

"Not too much puzzle in the puzzle here, but Nick grows ever more engaging, and the masterful London scene, pulsing with vitality and crammed with everyday horrors, provides an easy-to- take history lesson in a first-class entertainment."
Seventh in a series set in mid-18th-century London and featuring the sleuthing exploits of inventor-statesman Benjamin Franklin as narrated, written, and sketched by his devoted, illegitimate, 15-year-old son Nick (Murder by the Waters, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
MURDER BY THE WATERS by Robert Lee Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 1995

"A glowingly alive evocation of the era's Sin City, a nicely mystifying puzzle, and Nick's charming narration—all make for the best of this series so far."
Number four in the Benjamin Franklin series (Benjamin Franklin and the Case of the Artful Murder, 1994, etc.) finds the inventor- statesman and Nick, his 13-year-old son, setting out on the two-day journey from London to Bath. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 16, 1994

"A charming little mystery, cleverly plotted with nice 18th-century flavor."
The latest in the Ben Franklin series (Murder at Drury Lane, 1992, etc.) finds the renowned statesman, inventor, and sleuth searching for the lost Shenstone diamond. Read full book review >
MURDER AT DRURY LANE by Robert Lee Hall
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 1992

"Overall: a pleasurable read for fans of the historical mystery and a possible recommendation for bright YA readers."
Ben Franklin, spouting fewer aphorisms than before (Benjamin Franklin and the Case of Christmas Murder, etc.), sits through a David Garrick production at London's Drury Lane Theatre when unlikable heckler Dudley Midge tumbles from the balcony and dies. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 2, 1990

Second in a series featuring aphorism-spouting Ben Franklin as detective, his 12-year-old illegitimate son Nicolas as his amanuensis, and London of the mid-1700's. Read full book review >