Books by Scott Morse

DUGOUT by Scott Morse
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 25, 2019

"A grand slam. (Graphic fantasy. 7-11)"
Sports, spells, and sibling rivalry abound. Read full book review >
MAGIC PICKLE by Scott Morse
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2008

Different plot, different format, same cast: Running in parallel to published chapter-book episodes such as Magic Pickle and the Planet of the Grapes (2007), this scenario-setter introduces the bulked-up cuke superhero. Blasting out of a lab hidden beneath the floor of feisty everylass Jo Jo Wigman, he propels himself into battle with the Brotherhood of Evil Produce—in particular the quick and canny Romaine Gladiator. "Weapon Kosher" (his codename) comes through of course, dispensing "Dill Justice" to all villains while JoJo takes on class princess Lu Lu Deederly on the side. Portraying the nonstop action with an effervescent blend of discrete panels and insets, Morse depicts his flying pickled protagonist with muscular arms and a "tasteful yet mysteriously revealing" star above a pair of ferociously squinting eyes. Evidently to make up the page count, the author tacks on a short yet silly encounter between Pickle and a lottery-winning bazillionaire who's been transformed into a coconut, then closes with basic advice for aspiring cartoonists. Diverting and dill-ectable. (Graphic novel. 8-10) Read full book review >
MAGIC PICKLE AND THE PLANET OF THE GRAPES by Scott Morse
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2008

When the whole planet's in a dilly of a dilemma, who ya gonna call? Magic Pickle, of course—that buff, green and all-kosher adversary of the scheming Brotherhood of Evil Produce. Dwelling in Capital Dill, a secret lab right beneath the bedroom of intrepid young sidekick JoJo Wigman, Pickle barrels out in this series opener to face the shriveled but powerful Razin', whose plan for world conquest has kicked off with a barrage of well-aimed sour grapes that have turned everyone in JoJo's school into round purple zombies. Morse illustrates this vegetarian adventure with plenty of splotchy, energetic line drawings that switch, for combat scenes, to sequential panels of sound-effects-heavy action. In the end, thanks to JoJo's quick thinking and a brisk shower of strawberry juice, what passes for normality is restored and, as Pickle puts it, "we can raze The Razin' from the roster of rogues." Readers will be smirkin' at the exploits of this gherkin. (Fantasy. 9-11)Read full book review >