Books by Sheldon Siegel

THE CONFESSION by Sheldon Siegel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 23, 2004

"Siegel's dialogue crackles with pace and authenticity. His brisk narrative offers a nonstop barrage of cynical asides to the reader—not to every taste."
Sardonic Frisco attorney Michael Daley defends a popular priest against a murder charge. Read full book review >
FINAL VERDICT by Sheldon Siegel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 11, 2003

"Courtroom scenes, full of legal maneuvering, are highlights as Siegel's sharp style turns them into mini-dramas (or comedies). By contrast, the whodunit plot rarely surprises or provides any fresh twists."
San Francisco attorney Mike Daley struggles in and out of the courtroom while trying to find evidence to clear a troublesome and terminally ill client. Read full book review >
CRIMINAL INTENT by Sheldon Siegel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 26, 2002

"All talk and no tension. A legal cozy in a great big village."
Siegel trudges his priestly San Francisco attorney Mike Daley (Special Circumstances, 2000, etc.) against evil cinematic types, one of whom has clobbered another to death with an Oscar. Read full book review >
INCRIMINATING EVIDENCE by Sheldon Siegel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 31, 2001

"No surprise ending, alas, but from beginning to end, an effective page-turner with a realistic, if somewhat cynical, climax that holds true to the powerhouse milieu in which Daley and his colleagues have been operating all along."
When San Francisco D.A. Prentice Marshall "Skipper" Gates III, of all people, is charged with the death of a male teenage prostitute, the city braces for the first trial of the century, and attorney Mike Daley (Special Circumstances, 2000) scrambles to build a case. Read full book review >
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES by Sheldon Siegel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 8, 2000

"Not the worst legal thriller a lawyer-novelist ever generated, but all those pages between rewards may make readers yearn for a continuance."
Yes, it's another bulky debut by a lawyer about the intricacies of a murder case—as overlong and overfamiliar as the O.J. trial. Read full book review >