Books by Sister Souljah

Released: Jan. 29, 2013

"A book that will appeal to the author's many fans."
A novel that reads more like a memoir than fiction. Read full book review >
MIDNIGHT by Sister Souljah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2008

"Lengthy coming-of-age set apart by the hero's African identity, but never is the willful Midnight believable as a 14-year-old."
A young Sudanese immigrant struggles to hold onto his traditional values while growing up on New York's meanest streets. Read full book review >
THE COLDEST WINTER EVER by Sister Souljah
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1999

Debut novel by hip-hop rap artist Sister Souljah, whose No Disrespect (1994), which mixes sexual history with political diatribe, is popular in schools country-wide. In its way, this is a tour de force of black English and underworld slang, as finely tuned to its heroine's voice as Alice Walker's The Color Purple. The subject matter, though, has a certain flashiness, like a black Godfather family saga, and the heroine's eventual fall develops only glancingly from her character. Born to a 14-year-old mother during one of New York's worst snowstorms, Winter Santiaga is the teenaged daughter of Ricky Santiaga, Brooklyn's top drug dealer, who lives like an Arab prince and treats his wife and four daughters like a queen and her princesses. Winter lost her virginity at 12 and now focuses unwaveringly on varieties of adolescent self-indulgence: sex and sugar-daddies, clothes, and getting her own way. She uses school only as a stepping-stone for getting out of the house—after all, nobody's paying her to go there. But if there's no money in it, why go? Meanwhile, Daddy decides it's time to move out of Brooklyn to truly fancy digs on Long Island, though this places him in the discomfiting position of not being absolutely hands-on with his dealers; and sure enough the rise of some young Turks leads to his arrest. Then he does something really stupid: he murders his wife's two weak brothers in jail with him on Riker's Island and gets two consecutive life sentences. Winter's then on her own, especially with Bullet, who may have replaced her dad as top hood, though when she selfishly fails to help her pregnant buddy Simone, there's worse—much worse—to come. Thinness aside: riveting stuff, with language so frank it curls your hair. (Author tour) Read full book review >
NO DISRESPECT by Sister Souljah
HISTORY
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

It must be hard being right all the time, but controversial rapper and black activist Sister Souljah doesn't mind, judging from her remarkably smug, occasionally uplifting memoir. Let there be no doubt, this ``young sultry, big, brown-eyed, voluptuous, wholesome, intelligent, spiritual, ghetto girl'' has opinions. She is for belief in God, hard work, self-respect, community service, political activism, a strong family structure, and black women sharing their men in the face of a huge supply-side shortage. She is against abortion, narcotics, the welfare system, interracial dating, and homosexuality. Passionate in all things, Souljah's juxtaposition of her activism and her active hormones can produce odd results. When a man she wants turns up at a committee meeting, she recounts: ``I...set to work on how to organize Black students across the country into an African student network. With moist panties and a body that wanted to be touched...I argued that most African students were confronted by the same problems.'' Souljah's political beliefs frequently become little more than sidelines to her accounts of failed romances—indignant stories of a strong, single, sexy black heroine and the brothers who let her down. The men who fail come in all varieties (from her father to her mother's lovers and her own), but Souljah concludes that their shortcomings are the result of centuries of white racist oppression—psychological, political, cultural. Ultimately, the book reveals the psyche of a young black woman who feels she has been betrayed by too many and who trusts no one. Everyone disappoints her. After eight chapters (each named for the guilty individual in question: ``Mother,'' ``Nathan,'' ``Mona,'' etc.), a predictable pattern emerges in which Souljah's initial optimism wears off and gives way first to rationalization, then to harsh condemnation. Part fiery political diatribe, part searing sexual history, part unintentional psychological profile, Souljah throws more heat than light. Read full book review >