Books by Stephen Marche

Stephen Marche, 27, has published short fiction in Descant, The New Quarterly, and Event, and his story “Garrison Creek,” originally published in The Malahat Review, was shortlisted for the 2002 O. Henry Prize.


THE UNMADE BED by Stephen Marche
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Satisfying food for thought on the ever changing dynamics of men and women as they interact and go about their individual lives."
Examination of the new roles women and men are playing in the home and the workplace. Read full book review >
THE HUNGER OF THE WOLF by Stephen Marche
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"An entertaining, curious journey into the beating black hearts that occupy the penthouse suites and those who aspire to join them."
Marche scrutinizes the rapaciousness of contemporary media moguls by cleverly reimagining them as actual wolves. Read full book review >
HOW SHAKESPEARE CHANGED EVERYTHING by Stephen Marche
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2011

"Informed, ebullient and profoundly respectful."
Esquire columnist and novelist Marche (Shining at the Bottom of the Sea, 2007, etc.) argues that Shakespeare is the most influential human being—in nearly every arena—who ever lived. Read full book review >
SHINING AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA by Stephen Marche
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 2, 2007

"If your bookshelf only has room for one anthology of Sanjanian fiction, this is it."
The conceptual ingenuity of this volume—an anthology that purports to document the literary progression and legacy of an imaginary island—offers flashes of metafictional illumination amid what often reads like an elaborate in-joke. Read full book review >
RAYMOND AND HANNAH by Stephen Marche
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"A touching narrative, frustratingly at arm's length."
One-night stand of a mid-20s Toronto couple stretches into travel to Jerusalem, in a brief first novel, self-conscious and finally compromised hopelessly by its own editorial apparatus—with actual author's notes in the margin. Read full book review >