Books by T. Greenwood

KEEPING LUCY by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 6, 2019

"A serious subject cheapened by melodrama that rings inauthentic."
Greenwood's earlier novels of family dysfunction (Rust and Stardust, 2018, etc.) have hooked onto issues ranging from anorexia to child abduction; here Down syndrome disrupts a young woman's life and marriage. Read full book review >
RUST & STARDUST by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2018

"An overlong journey through a stranger-than-fiction life."
A fictional account of the real-life 1940s kidnapping that inspired Lolita. Read full book review >
THE HUNGRY SEASON by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Maudlin, melodramatic and predictable, but the author knows how to make her characters' suffering wrench readers' hearts."
Family-damage specialist Greenwood (Two Rivers, 2009, etc.) tackles a really big trauma—coping with a loved one's death from anorexia. Read full book review >
TWO RIVERS by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"Overwrought context obscures a sweetly told love story."
Ghosts of his heartbreaking past visit a railroad worker in rural New England. Read full book review >
UNDRESSING THE MOON by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Victimhood in all its glory."
A 30-year-old woman, near death, comes to grips with her mother's abandonment of the family 15 years earlier. Read full book review >
NEARER THAN THE SKY by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"Deft handling of a difficult and painful subject, slightly marred by one-dimensional people, but compelling nevertheless."
A young woman is forced to confront a long-held family secret: that her mother suffers from the mental illness known as Munchausen syndrome. Read full book review >
BREATHING WATER by T. Greenwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1999

In a first novel that strains for effect, a young woman summering in Vermont finds healing and happiness after an abusive relationship ends. The author prefaces each section with a poetic invocation that aims, it seems, to ratchet up the emotions and set the appropriate mood. But this never quite happens. Despite Greenwood's attempts to give the story cosmic values, it is essentially a schematic account of the usual: smart girl doing dumb things until she finally does wise up. Effie Greer, the English major protagonist, fell in love at college with the wrong man. Max was an abusive psychopath, but Effie moved in with him anyway and even brought him along after graduation to spend the summer at her family's camp on a Vermont lake. But then, after a terrible quarrel that Effie feels she may have provoked, Max went rowing and accidentally killed Keisha, a black girl visiting for the summer. After the accident, Effie fled alone to the West Coast, but as the story opens three years later she's back at the lake and finally free of Max, who has died from an overdose. Memories of their relationship alternate with the unfolding of the fateful summer's tragic events, but as Effie fixes up the family cabin and gets together with kin, she begins to put the past to rest. Gifts start mysteriously appearing at her door, and she soon meets the giver, Devin Jackson, an African-American artist renting a neighboring cottage for the summer, ostensibly to work. The two fall in love, of course, but Devin has hidden reasons for being there: he's Keisha's older brother who's come to grieve but has learned to love the lake as Effie does. Mutual confessions only deepen the pair's burgeoning feelings, and a convenient legacy assures that more summers at the lake wait in Effie's future. Familiar themes with a slight twist, but, nevertheless, still more familiar than not. Read full book review >