Books by Tim Severin

Tim Severin, explorer/traveller, author, film-maker and lecturer, made his first expedition by motor cycle along the route of Marco Polo while still a student at Oxford. He has sailed a leather boat across the Atlantic in the wake of St. Brendan the Nav


IN SEARCH OF ROBINSON CRUSOE by Tim Severin
Released: June 1, 2002

"As he typically does, Severin takes a fanciful story of adventure on the high seas and makes it delightfully real through exacting research and personal observation. (Line drawings)"
The entertaining Severin (The Spice Islands Voyage, 1998, etc.) is off on another fact-finding mission, this time to take the measure of Robinson Crusoe. Read full book review >
THE SPICE ISLANDS VOYAGE by Tim Severin
Released: May 1, 1998

"As an expertly illustrated travelogue, nature book, sea tale, and biography, Severin's work qualifies as great entertainment. (b&w and color illustrations) (Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
Following in the footsteps of Alfred Wallace, the 19th-century naturalist who perhaps beat Darwin in formulating a theory of evolution, author/explorer Severin (The China Voyage, 1995, etc.) sails among the island groups of eastern Indonesia, assessing the differences a century and a half has made on the region's flora and fauna. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 23, 1995

"Brilliantly told story of hope, camaraderie, and closeness to the elements. (color inserts, not seen)"
Award-winning writer and adventurer Severin (In Search of Genghis Khan, 1992, etc.) describes how he and his crew of seven made the seemingly impossible voyage across the Pacific in a craft that Chinese sailors might have used 2,000 years ago. Read full book review >
IN SEARCH OF GENGHIS KHAN by Tim Severin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1992

"Travel writing at its best. (Photographs—16 pages b&w, 8 pages color—not seen.)"
Reflecting that peculiarly British enthusiasm for travel and adventure in distant and usually inclement climes, veteran writer and traveler Severin (Tracking Marco Polo, 1986, etc.) went to Mongolia ``to see how much of the traditional way of life survived.'' Having written a thesis at Oxford on the first Europeans to venture into Central Asia during the great Mongol Empires of the 13th and 14th centuries, Severin was delighted when asked in the late 1980's to visit Mongolia. Read full book review >