Books by Trina Schart Hyman

CHANGING WOMAN AND HER SISTERS by Trina Schart Hyman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: May 15, 2006

"A transcendent collaboration that will reward repeated study. (Folklore. 9-14)"
Why have the power and wisdom of goddesses faded so profoundly from our collective consciousness? Read full book review >
MERLIN AND THE MAKING OF THE KING by Margaret Hodges
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"A wonderful addition to the inexhaustible riches of Camelot. (Folklore. 6-10)"
A perfectly beautiful small volume by the wizardly team of Hodges and Hyman. Read full book review >
SENSE PASS KING by Katrin Tchana
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 15, 2002

"It's too bad that Hyman resorts to the stock stereotype of drawing the evil king as fat; otherwise, these riveting acrylic paintings shine with clarity, humanity, and beauty. (Picture book/folktale. 4-7)"
Rich colors and expertly posed people and animals bring both lushness and specificity to this gorgeously illustrated tale from Cameroon. Read full book review >
CHILDREN OF THE DRAGON by Sherry Garland
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"This unusual collection of tales will work best for individual readers as they drink in the details of the stories, the background materials, and the paintings. (Folktales. 9-12)"
Six stories of varying types have been chosen by an author who is familiar with the Vietnamese people in their own country and in the US. Read full book review >
HAUNTS by Angela Shelf Medearis
FANTASY
Released: Dec. 15, 1996

"Warn all but intrepid readers not to start on this collection after sundown. (Short stories. 10-12)"
Medearis (Treemonisha, 1995, etc.) makes careful additions to five goosebump-raising tales, which are all either set in rural Texas or have a Southern flavor: A widow's moldering husband rises again for one "Last Dance at the Dew Drop Inn"; with the help of a mysterious dog, Lilly rescues her brother Freeson from the weirdly compelling "Fiddler Man"; an encounter with a headless horseman leaves two sisters "Scared Silly"; and a drought-stricken small town gets more water than it bargains for from "The Rainmaker." Read full book review >
THE GOLEM by Barbara Rogasky
adapted by Barbara Rogasky, illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 15, 1996

"The art- -full-page and spot illustrations in full color—lends not only a sense of place and excitement, but mythic grandeur as well. (Folklore. 8+)"
The Golem walks the streets again, in the crafty conjuring of Rogasky (Smoke and Ashes, 1988) and the evocative illustrations of Hyman. Read full book review >
COMUS by Margaret Hodges
adapted by Margaret Hodges, illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: March 15, 1996

"Not an exceptional book, but quite skillfully done. (Picture book/folklore. 5-9)"
Hodges (Gulliver in Lilliput, 1995, etc.) bases her story on Milton's theatrical version of what may be the oldest of all English fairy tales, "Childe Roland." Read full book review >
THE ADVENTURES OF HERSHEL OF OSTROPOL by Eric A. Kimmel
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 15, 1995

"Kimmel's retelling aptly captures the ethnic origins of the collection, detailed in a foreword, and a last chapter, 'Hershel's Sayings,' is a treat. (Fiction/folklore. 6-10)"
Ten tales about the legendary Jewish trickster Hershel, including stories in which he outwits his own family, a bandit who tries to rob him, a local rabbi, an angel, and a count, and one in which he is outwitted by another trickster but gets revenge. Read full book review >
GHOST EYE by Marion Dane Bauer
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Hyman contributes a wealth of drawings; cats are one of her fortes, and these are a pleasure. (Fiction. 7-11)"
When old Lydia goes to a nursing home, her cat Purrloom Popcorn ("a white Cornish rex with one eye of brilliant blue and one of shining gold") goes on the competition circuit, where his extraordinary looks make him a Grand Champion. Read full book review >
THE FORTUNE-TELLERS by Lloyd Alexander
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A winning tale, superlatively presented. (Picture book. 4-10)"
When the poor, hard-working young carpenter seeks comfort from a fortuneteller, the old man hoodwinks him with double talk: "Rich you will surely be...[if] you earn large sums of money." Read full book review >
A LITTLE ALPHABET by Trina Schart Hyman
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 25, 1980

"Each scene is decorated with blossoms, fruit, curving vines, or the like, and the endpapers inform us that the flowers climbing up the H are honeysuckles, those peeking out around the Q are Queen Anne's lace, etc. A posy for the greeting-card trade."
A pretty little alphabet, measuring just 4 3/8" by 4 1/4", for those who measure the sweetness of a children's book by its nostalgia quotient. Read full book review >
WILL YOU SIGN HERE, JOHN HANCOCK? by Jean Fritz
Released: June 22, 1976

"Trina Schart Hyman applies her confectioner's touch to the dandified goings on, and her caricatures of Hancock—looking appropriately pompous, outraged, or chagrined—catch the mood of affectionate iconoclasm."
Jean Fritz goes rolling along, and we merrily after, through yet another fizzy tribute to our Founding Fathers. Read full book review >
WHY DON'T YOU GET A HORSE, SAM ADAMS? by Trina Schart Hyman
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 12, 1975

"A brisk, knowledgeable glimpse of how Samuel Adams got 'ready for history' — aimed at kids who aren't quite ready for it themselves."
It's hard to picture Sam Adams, preoccupied with the business of fomenting revolution, paying too much attention to the bad, ring of his conventional cousin and dashing John Hancock who want him to learn to ride horseback like a proper patriot. Read full book review >
HOW SIX FOUND CHRISTMAS by Trina Schart Hyman
FICTION
Released: Oct. 21, 1969

"What's in the word Christmas? intrinsically nothing but sense satisfaction and a symbolic sprig."
Not knowing what it is, only—from the little girl—that there's such a word, six search for Christmas and, finding a snow-covered green bottle that partially fits each of the animals' prerequisites (touch, taste, etc.), take it to be Christmas; taking it home, the little girl fills it with branches of berry and pine "And lo! Read full book review >