Books by Veronica Stallwood

OXFORD MOURNING by Veronica Stallwood
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 5, 1996

"Perhaps the liveliest of Kate's four appearances (Oxford Exit, 1995, etc.), though the cast is skeletal (both collectively and individually) and the windup is a letdown."
Always on the alert for a new subject for one of her historical novels, Kate Ivory is rapt by the recent discovery of diaries and letters by Maria Taylor, sister of Dickens inamorata Ellen Ternan. Read full book review >
OXFORD EXIT by Veronica Stallwood
Released: March 1, 1995

"Mystery and characters alike generate so little interest that the burden of entertainment falls heavily on the culprit's confession, which reads a little too calculatedly like a classroom exercise."
Somebody (more than one somebody, actually) has been lifting rare 19th-century sensational novels from Oxford's Bodleian Library and wiping out all traces of their existence from the library's computerized catalogue. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Despite a nice eye for the absurdity of suburban rituals, Stallwood (Deathspell, 1992) leans a little too hard on repeated doses of those old standbys—blackmail and adultery; her sketchy characters barely cast shadows."
Inoffensive Rose Smith has a problem: her estranged husband Theo has kept half the collection of memento mori enamel boxes that her well-heeled aunt gave them as a wedding present—and that she now expects to see on her next visit. Read full book review >
DEATHSPELL by Veronica Stallwood
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Overlong and insufficiently creepy, but once the focus is off bad-seed Tess, the plot heats up with some rather deft adult complications."
A short story stretched to novel length in this British author's tedious debut—all about ten-year-old Tess's loathing of stepdad Malcolm, who wants her sent to boarding school; her hatred of her three stepbrothers, particularly the sadistic Joe; and her fervent wish for life to be as it was when she and her sister and her mom lived with daddy. Read full book review >