Books by Wes Hargis

THE WATER CYCLE by Nate Ball
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"A solid start to a new science series. (Informational picture book. 5-10)"
Ms. Frizzle and her magical bus have some competition. Read full book review >
AGATHA PARROT AND THE THIRTEENTH CHICKEN by Kjartan Poskitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 27, 2017

"An enthusiastic romp with a friendly grade schooler, just right for those newly transitioning to chapter books. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Agatha Parrot is back for another silly, almost plausible adventure. Read full book review >
AGATHA PARROT AND THE HEART OF MUD by Kjartan Poskitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 27, 2016

"Agatha is distinctive, funny, and engaging. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Agatha Parrot is a sprightly kind of girl. Read full book review >
AGATHA PARROT AND THE ODD STREET SCHOOL GHOST by Kjartan Poskitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 5, 2016

"Despite the flimsy plot and marginal character development, Agatha's silly antics and enthusiastic delivery should engage readers transitioning to chapter books. (Fiction. 7-10)"
When the Odd Street School's clock-tower bell rings off-schedule one night, Agatha Jane Parrot and her chums suspect a mischievous ghost may be the cause. Read full book review >
MY NEW TEACHER AND ME! by Al Yankovic
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2013

"Sure to feed imaginations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A by-the-rules teacher and a tall-tale-telling student don't see eye to eye on the first day of school in Yankovic's rhyming salute to the power of the imagination. Read full book review >
I NEED MY OWN COUNTRY! by Rick Walton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Disgruntled and long-suffering children will cheer at this assertion of power. Especially those with political aspirations. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Childhood is full of injustices—why not start your own country, where you can make the rules? Read full book review >
WHEN I GROW UP by Al Yankovic
by Al Yankovic, illustrated by Wes Hargis, developed by Bean Creative
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 14, 2011

"Fans will love that Mr. Yankovic himself provides the optional narration and all sound effects (including all gorilla grunts and snail cheers), injecting just a bit of the 'Weird' that is missing from the print version back into the mix. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
Voiced in rhymed couplets with a conscious tip of the hat to Seuss and Silverstein, this adaptation of the recently published book adds even more elements to an already overstuffed story—with unexpectedly good results. Read full book review >
WHEN I GROW UP by Al Yankovic
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

A disappointing exploration of career options from an entertainer who should know better. Maybe it has something to do with the decision to take the "Weird" out of his authorial name, but musical satirist Yankovic doesn't deliver the kind of precise zaniness adults of a certain generation will expect. Little Billy may be small in stature, but he doesn't limit his thinking when it comes to what he'll be when he grows up. As soon as Mrs. Krupp gives him the floor at show-and-tell, he grabs it and doesn't let go, reeling out a dizzying series of potential careers. Beginning with 12 rhyming couplets on what kind of a chef he might be, he follows up with snail trainer, machinist, giraffe milker, artist and on and on. At its best, the verse approaches Seussian: "maybe I'll be the lathe operator / Who makes the hydraulic torque wrench calibrator / Which fine-tunes the wrench that's specifically made / To retighten the nuts in the lateral blade." But the pacing never allows readers to stop and chuckle at the foolishness, and it doesn't leave enough room for Hargis' light, humorous cartoons to expand and ramp up the goof factor. In children's books, as in satire, less is more—here's hoping Weird Al's next effort is both tighter and funnier. (Picture book. 5-8)Read full book review >
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

Two men and a dog set off on the first transcontinental car trip in this fetching re-creation of a true story. Responding to a $50 bet, Horatio Jackson hires a mechanic, buys a 20-horsepower Winton (this was 1903) and sets out from San Francisco, acquiring a bulldog along the way. Considering that there were but 150 miles of paved road in the whole country at the time—and neither gas stations nor many road signs—their 5,600-mile journey to New York, accomplished in just 63.5 days, stands as a triumph of sheer perseverance. In his cartoon pictures Hargis depicts all three of his goggle-wearing travelers having the time of their lives, determinedly riding their increasingly mud-spattered horseless carriage through mountains, deserts and storms. The author sticks closely to the historical record in her present-tense narrative and layers in more detail, plus photos, in a closing note. Though she doesn't fill in all the blanks—where, for instance, did they find gas and spare parts?—her invitation to clamber aboard will be hard to resist. (Informational picture book. 7-9) Read full book review >