Books by Wil McCarthy

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"A fascinating glimpse of research that may in a few years find its way into our everyday lives."
Expanding on an article from Wired, SF novelist McCarthy (The Collapsium, 2000, etc.) asserts that the next breakthrough in materials science might be designer elements with properties programmable to whatever the customer requests. Read full book review >
THE COLLAPSIUM by Wil McCarthy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Brilliantly, breathtakingly inventive superscience—along with sophomoric sociology and a promising plot that languishes undeveloped."
Far-future yarn involving gravity engineering, programmable matter, electromagnetic grapples, and whatnot, from the author of Bloom (1998), etc. Supergenius Bruno de Towaji now lives alone on a private planetoid in the Kuiper Belt; having engineered the Iscog, or interplanetary telecom network capable of transmitting, or "faxing," human patterns, out of collapsium, structured diamond-coated microscopic black holes, he's fabulously rich. Read full book review >
BLOOM by Wil McCarthy
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Despite some conceptual problems, an ingenious yarn with challenging ideas, well-handled technical details and plenty of twists and turns: a whopping improvement on Murder in the Solid State (1996), though the sophomoric narrative voice is dismayingly similar. (Author tour)"
By the early 22nd century, artificially created life-forms—mycora—that can dissolve stone, metal, flesh, anything, with terrifying speed, have taken over the Earth, the Moon, and Venus; the only human survivors cower behind biological barriers far away in the asteroids (the Gladholders) or the moons of Jupiter and Saturn (the Immunity). Read full book review >
MURDER IN THE SOLID STATE by Wil McCarthy
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1996

"Even the nanotechnology offers no thrills."
McCarthy's third novel and first hardcover is set in a near- future Philadelphia dominated by the Gray Party, which is rapidly turning the US into a police state under the pretext of providing law and order. Read full book review >