Books by William Styron

SELECTED LETTERS OF WILLIAM STYRON by William Styron
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 4, 2012

"A great read for Styron devotees, but fans of correspondence will miss the conversational quality of most letter collections."
A good portion of William Styron's personal and business correspondence brought together in one volume. Read full book review >
THE SUICIDE RUN by William Styron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2009

"Essential reading for the writer's fans; a revelatory footnote for others."
Short fiction from a Southern master of the sweeping, ambitiously themed, epic novel. Read full book review >
HAVANAS IN CAMELOT by William Styron
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 15, 2008

"A poignant reminder of the power and appeal of a voice now silent."
Slim but substantial gathering of personal pieces by the late novelist and memoirist. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

A short little trip into a half-comfortable kind of writerly nostalgia in three stories (declares an Author's Note) that "reflect the experiences of the author at the ages of twenty, ten, and thirteen." Bending his hand again to scenes of WW II, Styron visits ("Love Day") a Marine Division in the Pacific, offering in brief form a standard cast of characters from Many-a-Movie: the tough but just-a-guy commander; the platoon leader who wants to be a writer; the narrator who has secret home-thoughts and, through them, learns something about meaning and fear. Read full book review >

DARKNESS VISIBLE by William Styron
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 4, 1990

"Each victim of depression is unique, and we feel that Styron has shown us—in large strokes without getting as razor-edged as Robert Lowell—as much of his black pit as he can bear to show."
Styron tells of his descent into clinical depression, later hospitalization, and recovery. Read full book review >
THIS QUIET DUST by William Styron
Released: Nov. 30, 1982

A generous but only sporadically impressive sampling from the noted novelist's occasional non-fiction over the past 20 years: book reviews, magazine articles, eulogies, commencement addresses, and other speeches. Read full book review >
SOPHIE'S CHOICE by William Styron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 11, 1976

More than once in this smugly autobiographical novel, Styron pouts about how his last book, The Confessions of Nat Turner, drew accusations of exploitation, accusations that "I had turned to my own profit and advantage the miseries of slavery." Read full book review >
THE CONFESSIONS OF NAT TURNER by William Styron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 1967

"This makes the book uneasy to reconcile—whether as a polemic or a novel; and then again there is no congruence between the Nat Turner who lived and died before the Civil War and the Nat Turner who seems to be a superimposition of the '60's, resurrected in some flagrantly modern scenes."
Few first novels promised so much for a new writer as Styron's Faulknerian Lie Down in Darkness; with only one flawed major book in between, now sixteen years later it is difficult to relate this to the early book except for the emotional charge of some of the writing, most effective when descriptive. Read full book review >
SET THIS HOUSE ON FIRE by William Styron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 3, 1960

"Too sensational for many, this will be widely read and much discussed."
The third and long-awaited novel by the author of the critically celebrated Lie Down in Darkness, this is a complex, ambitious book which sets out to explore the limits and varieties of good and evil and in the process presents a picture of recent American life which is drawn in compelling detail and with strong authority. Read full book review >
Released: June 15, 1959

"For those readers who like to keep au courant with present day writing and do not demand the definitive in short story collections."
In his introduction to this collection of fifteen stories from the seven year old literary magazine, William Styron notes that the Paris Review publishes the most promising fiction—not the greatest, not stories representing one school of writing. Read full book review >