Books by Winston S. Churchill

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 1997

A "filial and objective" biography of Winston S. Churchill's only son, Randolph, by Randolph's son. Randolph Churchill, named for a grandfather who was an important parliamentary leader in the 1880s, was born to Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, in London in 1911. Winston Churchill, who had been a soldier and a successful journalist, was already immersed in his brilliant political career at the time of Randolph's birth, and the early pages of this biography are a narrative of Winston Churchill's career as home secretary and first lord of the admiralty, including the catastrophic failure of the Gallipoli campaign, with which Winston, became identified, a tragedy that became indelibly imprinted on the small boy's memory. Randolph grew up in an atmosphere dominated by the powerful intellect and forceful personality of his father. Winston, for his part, tried his best to be the loving parent to Randolph that his own father had never been to him. Educated at Eton and Oxford, Randolph was, like his father, an indifferent student with evident gifts, but unlike Winston he developed habits of indolence and a quarrelsome, arrogant streak that marked his adult personality. Eventually he followed his father into politics and journalism; he had great success with the latter in the 1930s, but less with the former, failing three times as a Conservative candidate to achieve election to Parliament, but finally becoming MP from Preston as WW II neared. Having married Pamela Digby (later to be Mrs. Averell Harriman), he served in the war with the Desert Army and in the Balkans. After the war, he wrote numerous books, including two volumes of a well-regarded biography of his father. He died in 1968. Randolph's career is a historical footnote, but the author's close examination of his father's complex relationship with Winston Churchill, augmented with excerpts from their voluminous correspondence, make this a valuable contribution to Churchill scholarship. Read full book review >
THE SIX DAY WAR by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 19, 1967

Randolph Churchill sat at home and tuned in on one the recent Israeli-Arab conflict. His son Winston, a journalist, covered the week of the war at the front. Their chronicle begins with a quick, lucid historical briefing which owes much to Christopher Sykes' Crossroads to Israel. Then it delves into the Aqaba crisis, the "six day war" proper, international reactions, and the aftermath through mid-July. Of particular interest: remarks on the dynamics of Israeli politics and the structure of the armed forces, the strains of mobilization and the reasons for their victory (a much swifter one than foreign observers realized at the time)...and a discriminating distribution of excerpts from speeches and interviews. The subject-matter is replete with preposterous moves by Nasser, but the pro-Israeli bias behind the authors' British detachment remains under control. They offer modest editorials about U.N. impotence, the refugee problem, and the prerequisites for a genuine peace. Having emphasized the responsibility of schizoid U.S. policy and Soviet arms-pushing for the militarization of this ancient strife, they conclude that the superpowers should stop "playing politics" in the Middle East. Little here for students of long-range causes and effects, but highly readable raw material for the under-informed and the battle replayers. Read full book review >
GREAT DESTINY by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: March 15, 1965

(YA) Here is one volume and in the great man's own words, is a compendium of the experiences and opinions of Sir Winston Churchill. F.W. Heath, editor, has drawn extracts from Sir Winston's books , with the exception of the six volumes of The Second World War and A History of the English Speaking Peoples. The selections reach from My Early Life through The River War, the First World War and aftermath, and the warning of Step by Step to speeches during World War II, presented here under the heading, "The Voice of Courage." There is also a section devoted to famous men — Lord Randolph Churchill, Marlborough, and great contemporaries, Shaw and Chamberlain among them. Upon leaving Sandhurst, Churchill remarks that the world "opened like Aladdin's cave... an endless moving picture in which one was an actor." This volume, essentially devoted, as was his life, to war and politics, holds the fascination of personal and public history. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Nov. 30, 1959

This reports the details on the publisher's edition of Life magazine's condensed History, originally published in 6 volumes. There will be 70% new photographs, nearly double the number of colored pages — many of these rare photographs not available ten years ago. Norman Ross, the editor, examined some 14,000 pictures before determining his selection,- 311 photographs. The de luxe edition contains in addition a long-playing Columbia Masterpiece record of Churchill's war speeches and a special slip case. Extensive promotion by radio and TV will help launch the book. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: March 17, 1958

A tremendous achievement, this four volume history of the countries that comprise the English speaking peoples of the globe. And this, the final volume, must in many ways have been the most difficult of all to write, for here, compressed into less than 400 pages, is a century which saw the British Empire come to fulfillment; the United States emerge from colonialism into a nation forged by fire; India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand round out a pattern, two through successive uprisings, "minor" wars, seething unrest, the other two from raw frontiers, dumps for the scum of streets and prisons, into self- sufficient areas with vast undeveloped wealth and progress before them. And Canada-from the Maritime Provinces whence came lumber for the mother country's navy, to British Columbia, with immense untouched wilderness in between - begins to take shape as an entity capable of expansion and cohesion and a pride of identity. The scope of the volume precludes its providing the sense of intimate drama and human interest to the extent of the earlier books. But the grasp of the sense of history in the building, of the English speaking peoples encompassing the globe, of the warp and woof in the texture of drive, imagination, persistence, dogged courage that went into this achievement have enormous drama of their own. One on the outside, racing through these vivid pages, may well find critical judgment in abeyance. For here indeed is the man who did not become the king's first minister to preside over the dismemberment of the empire, telling in his inimitable way the story of that empire. That politics and man's venality, that violence and inhumanity and greed, all went into that building is implicit, not glossed over. But that a great conception of a goal, an ideal was a part of the plan- this too comes through and gives any English speaking reader a sense of shared achievement in the record. This rounds out a great work, but stands firmly on its own. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Oct. 14, 1957

The span of time from 1688 to 1815, covered in this third volume, compassed three major revolutions,- revolutions in a political and military sense, but revolutions, too, that profoundly affected mankind. Common to all three were ware between the English and the French:- the English Revolution which brought William of Orange and his wife Mary to the English throne, and resulted in years of war over France's part in England's rule, over the Spanish succession, over the relative powers of Parliament and the Crown at home; the American Revolution and the futile sary echo in the War of 1812, which separated the English speaking peoples into two distinct governments, but could not destroy their unity of language and tradition and law; and the French Revolution, which provided world wide political upheaval, laid the ground for economic upheaval, and ended only when Napoleon'- bid world tutorship was finally vetoed at Waterloo. England was committed to Proteatantiem, to an Empire which included Canada in the New World, India in the rient to martime greatness everywhere; the Crown was subordinated to Parliament and the basic principles of the Magna Carta were given new significance in the rights of man. While Churchill loses no opportunity- within the limitations of space-for ching sharp vignettes of personalities and issues; while he splashes his canvas with vigorous drawings of campaigns and battles; this volume inevitably emerges as more specifically political history than its predecessors, The Birth of Britain and The New World. Memorable history, vividly written, intensely personal in projection and execution, this is again an exciting publishing event. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Nov. 26, 1956

The drama of England gathers momentum in this second volume, as the Tudors take over and the War of the Roses comes to an end with the death of Richard III. Churchill's genius for bringing the complex threads together into a coherent whole is challenged in the immensity of this task — and he comes through triumphant. While scholars may quibble over his unremitting acceptance of color, pattern and viewpoint as he sees it, the average reader will find it easy to accept this as definitive. The princes were murdered with Richard's connivance; Mary Queen of Scots did conspire with her ministers against the life of Elizabeth; Oliver Cromwell was a cold-blooded though reluctant- dictator; the summons of William of Orange and his wife, Mary, saved England when her liberties, religious and political, were threatened, etc., etc. The sweep of story and history, of personalities and the motives that swayed them are sharply etched, as Sir Winston covers the eventful years from the accession of Henry VII to the exile of James II. The reigns in particular of Henry VIII, Elizabeth, of Charles I, of the Roundheads under Cromwell accent complete achievement, reversal, threat, triumph of the essential factors that made England. One has a rounded sense of the dominant figures, the issues and their resolution, the economic, political and social changes taking place. One gets less than might be wished of the artistic and creative sides of life. But one gets more of the scope of England's achievement, the penetration into a world beyond its own shores, and the formulation of the basic tenets of their creed. December Book of the Month selection gives this command performance status, and all who read The Birth Of Britain will provide a waiting market for Vol. II. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: April 23, 1956

A rare gift for vision, a sense of drama, a genius for the right word, an imaginative sense of people and story are here applied to the beginnings of a great people. Winston Churchill was endowed with a sense of history- and this is an ambitious project into which he has poured his great gifts. 'Begun in 1939, now finished, to be issued in four volumes over the next three years, this will be for the average reader the definitive history; for the student an inspiration for further study. For Sir Winston makes even his earliest period, in the dawn of the island's checkered history, seem alive. One goes through successive invasions, conquests, struggles for power with an awareness of the contribution each invader, each conqueror made to the building of a nation. Romans, Danes, Normans, each in turn became part of the life stream. Men advanced the island's development- or threw it back for long periods. Great figures and events took place on the stage of history. The things that characterize the English speaking race today put down roots that survived. Churchill does not hesitate to illumine the past through contrast and comparison with the present. He makes his story a living, growing thing. His human beings stand out against their times- good and evil as they may be. He reinterprets old legends, retaining much we learned in childhood, but throwing new light upon it. Exciting and revealing reading, this provides the background we need for other reading-fact and fiction, and leaves us with eager anticipation for the volumes to come. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: April 16, 1956

Not many people know that at 24 Winston Churchill wrote his one and only novel. He had served with the IVth Hussars in India, and to them he inscribed the book. He was himself first elected to Parliament that year. Reread today, it can be considered in double focus:- first as an allegory, the story of a mythical republic, which previews the development of now familiar totalitarian patterns; second as a foretaste of Churchill's own development along social and political lines. These two angles give the book considerably more interest than its slightly dated style would attract today. There's to be a new introduction by Sir Winston Churchill, but as of present writing this is not available. Watch for this- as it may be blown up into a newsworthy publishing event. Read full book review >
EUROPE UNITE by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: June 15, 1950

This is a companion volume to The Sinews of Peace, and incorporates the main speeches made by this greatest of modern craters during 1947-48. While the constructive positive aspect of his viewpoint on matters international, his plea for a united Europe, give title to the book, the greater part of the speeches are vitriolic attacks on the Labor Government, not only in its domestic but in its foreign policies, particularly in Palestine and India. He speaks as an aggressive, fighting leader of the Opposition; he leaves no stone unturned in his violent indictment of the system which he feels is impoverishing Britain, "the nation which fall flat on its face in the moment of greatest victory." He sees release only in a reversal through a General Election, too late, however, to restore the shrinking Empire. There are great themes and small, important political speeches, records of debates in the House, gracious gestures to organizations, to individuals (the sovereigns on their Silver Wedding, Mrs. Roosevelt, a broadcast on the occasion of the dedication of the Al Smith Memorial, etc.). Here shown is Churchill with much still of the brilliance and energy and fire of his middle years. The connecting chronology of dates and events links the speeches and places them in the record. Not a book for the market that buys his Second World War volumes. But Churchill's speeches are integral to modern history. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 15, 1950

Nothing available in advance of finished books (as noted on P. 674) so this report is anticlimactic in view of the extensive reviews already released, which seem collectively to say what we were saying anyhow. That- in a military sense, this is the most interesting of the series for Americans, as the period covered-1942 and the first half of 1943- encompasses the disastrous defeats of our early months of war, and the turn of the tide in the Pacific, in North Africa. That- in a personal sense, it is less Churchill's book than the earlier ones, when he was centre-on, the stage chiefly Britain's and Britain always most dramatic in bitterest defeat. That it lacks the recurrent resounding phrase and what some called the purple passages, but is significant in its honesty of greatness, the willingness to say he was hasty or wrong. What emerges is a Churchill big in his sometimes reluctant cooperation; a Churchill perceptive of the widening rifts with Russia, a Churchill cognizant of the lack of balance in America's attitude towards China, a Churchill anxious to keep the difficult DeGaulle-Darlan -Giraud impasse from wrecking the North African operation. Some of his thumbnail sketches of personalities afford as brilliant characterization as he has ever written. Some of his brief and dramatic bits of narrative afford as absorbing reading as any he has written. And the armchair strategists will find his military analyses an indispensable contribution to viewing the war from another side than the one we are offered in American records. A sure best seller- as well as documentarily important. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 24, 1950

Third in the four volume history of the war, and the one most intimately concerned with strategy and Britain's terrific responsibility in carrying on virtual global warfare single handed. A personal history as any book from Churchill's pen is sure to be he overrides the difficulties of the war in terms of its campaigns and planning for the layman. Pungent phrase, dramatic sense of values, a prose that marches — these stylistic factors make it good reading even when the subject matter seems tenuous and overdrawn. Throughout the text is spiced with his very personal views of men and events. There are superb tributes to a few, Harry Hopkins conspicuously among them, and, interestingly enough, the German general, Rommel. There's a very evident irritation against some of Britain's historic military figures, Wavell and Auchinleck, for instance, are now high, now low in his esteem. Of Wavell, some months before he was shifted to the Indian command, and Auchinleck put in his place, he writes:- "He gives the impression of being tired out". He blew hot and cold on Auchinleck, feeling him too cautious, too inclined to delay. Much of the argument that went on between the Admiralty, the home office, and the forces on the scene, is here told in detail for the first time. The handling of the Greek affair- the disaster in Crete- the African ports and the campaign of which Tobruk was the crux- the defense of Malta — all these come in for extensive off the record, in many cases, reporting. Few actual closeups- the Cretan campaign perhaps the closest to that- but an all pervading sense, on the part of the reader, of being at the heart of the matter. The revealing analysis of the difficulties with Stalin, the falsities of the public viewpoint, the burden of sharing from what was little enough, the lack of appreciation of the contribution made to the Soviet defense- all seems perceptive and prescient today. The book includes the inception of the Atlantic Charter, the historic meeting with Roosevelt, the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the Christmas visit of Churchill to the White House. These volumes from Mr. Churchill's pen constitute an important segment in source material on the Second World War. While this is not such easy reading as the two earlier volumes, there is an enormous amount of thrilling contemporary history encompassed in this period of victory beginning to seem possible out of disaster and defeat. Read full book review >
PAINTING AS A PASTIME by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: Feb. 7, 1950

A thoroughly charming and polished brief for the cultivation of hobbies — particularly painting. Recognizing the need in modern life for "relief, repose, refreshment" Churchill covers the many forms of diversion and the development of new pleasures in a change of occupation, and proceeds to underline the especial values of painting. As fun, as an incentive, as a companion, as a study, as a mental and physical exercise — he makes his points with telling case and smooth winningness, and gives his personal experiences with modest originality. A seductive introduction to personal participation in what is often felt to be an impossible field of activity (audacity is the "ticket") this should have a plus sale for the readers of his memoirs and prove of interest in art sections everywhere. Illustrated with 18 plates in color as evidence that his hobby has proved itself. Having sold 60,000 in England, this will have heavy advertising from the publisher, with postcards and display cards available to bookstores. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 1949

Newspaper syndication and LIFE magazine serialization have brought a generous proportion of the text of this second volume of Churchill's war memoirs to an eager public. Nonetheless, this — in the case of The Gathering Storm — seemed only to pique interest and curiosity. This second volume covers an intensely dramatic part of Britain's struggle, as France fell, the miracle of Dunkirk stirred the world, Italy entered on the side of Germany, England's strength was rebuilt from the bottom, the air war reached and passed its peak in the Battle of Britain, strength in the Mediterranean was reestablished, the African campaign turned to victory, the invasion of Greece by Italy posed a new problem, the U.S.A. and Britain drew closer together with the destroyer- air base deal and the establishment of Lend-Lease, and the Russian alliance with Germany passed into a dubious state. Churchill shares much that we did not know at the time:-the extent of knowledge of Germany's abortive plans for invasion, the foreknowledge of Hitler's decision to attack Russia, the "deal" with Spain, the hesitancy attendant on relations with the De Gaulle forces, the "leak" that resulted in disaster in west Africa. A careful comparison of the LIFE serialization with the finished book indicates that while a better job of editing has been done, there is still in the book a flavor or the Churchill who dominated the war years that the cutting has somehow lost. In a few instances, whole facets of the story have been omitted (non-essential to the flow, but interesting for rounding it out). In one instance- possibly more- LIFE has included material omitted from the book for reasons of policy, no doubt. An essential book for those who want the war from the inside in Britain. But for some indefinable reason, this second volume lacks the verve, the zest, the heady excitement of the first. Nonetheless, a sure best seller. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 21, 1948

A tremendous book of which the digests made for Life and the necessarily cut excerpts in the New York Times gave no conception. For Winston Churchill shows himself as historian, biographer, dramatist, journalist; important as is the substance of what he records of the years leading up to war, more important for the reader is the color and vigor and originality and fearlessness of his manner of recording. Churchill, the man, comes through- as he does in his broadcasting — as he does on the platform- as he does in his printed speeches — but as he failed to do (for this reader at least) in the slashed copy which ran serially. He makes the years of so-called peace pregnant with meaning (and with frightening parallels today). He shows with almost rhythmic precision the points at which World War II might have been prevented. He proves that democracy unless welded into larger organizations lacks security. He brings constant evidence to indicate the dangers in the counsels of prudence. Britain and France consistently lost ground while Germany rearmed. British "fatuity and fecklessness" made the Manchurian incident, Abyssinia, the occupation of the Rhineland, the results of the Saar plebescite, the betrayal at Munich possible. And yet Churchill avoids direct attack on Chamberlain, simply saying that the fundamental bases of the differences lay between "sweet reasonableness and the mailed fist". By the time Britain was awake to inevitability of war, Germany was in her fourth year of preparation, Britain her first. It was a sad tale of wrong judgments by well-meaning people. Further errors of judgment are indicated in the disdaining of the Russian offer of collaboration, in turning aside Roosevelt's desire for an intergovernmental conference — until it was too late, and the march of time brought the fall of Austria, Poland, Norway, Holland, Belgium. During the "twilight war" period, after Poland, Churchill again played a part, and records his service as Lord of the Admiralty, his plans- stymied by delay until too late. Vivid pen portraits throughout add immeasurably to the whole. Read full book review >
MAXIMS AND REFLECTIONS by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1947

This may well roll up considerable sales on the Churchill name and the opportunity Their Finest Hour affords booksellers to call this small book to customers' attention. The slant, I'd say, is that here for the reader is a composite of Churchill, in youth and maturity, through his own words, a refresher in when he said this, or that, or the other. Many facets of Churchill are here,- the man, the statesman, the politician, the orator, the writer, the patriot. We experience his flashes of wit, his kindliness, his barbed irony, his eloquence, his righteous indignation, — all the things we have savored in the written and spoken word. The Introduction by the editors is only incidentally biographical, and primarily an analysis of the techniques of Churchill's speeches and writing, an assessment of his greatness in literature, an appraisal of his many-sided personality, the defects and qualities of his temperament, his zest for life. A book for reference, for pick-up reading, in a collection of pregnant extracts from his words. Read full book review >
SECRET SESSION SPEECHES by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 22, 1946

Life Magazine published three of these speeches made in secret sessions of Parliament, — The Battle of the Atlantic, The Fall of Singapore, Darlan and the North African Landings — and good publicity cleared the newsstands of the issues almost as they came from the press-evidence of the lively interest in what the Prime Minister has said. As of today, there seems nothing sensational or startling in them — it has now been told. They are matter of fact explanations of unpalatable truths, — the necessity of secrecy, the tragic loss in shipping, the plans for meeting the U-boat peril, the reverses in the Far East. Some of the material seems in direct contradiction to statements made by others — particularly the material on the Darlan contretemps — so this is important for the record, as primary source material. It lacks — however — the spark that distinguishes Churchill's more public utterances. Read full book review >
VICTORY by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: Aug. 7, 1946

There are the 1945 speeches, from January through his defeat in the general election, a collection which covers a vital seven months in a fast changing world, months in which President Roosevelt died and Germany capitulated. In these months Churchill gave several surveys of events before the House; commented at length on Britain's intervention in Greece's Civil War; on Britain's contribution and losses; on the achievement of the C.R.I. command; on the Crimea Declaration and the three power conference; on the Curton line and its significance. He talked too of internal affairs; his political speeches in the election campaign are included; his tributes to General Eisenhower, to Franklin Roosevelt; his analysis of the world he believed the fighting men wanted to come back to (in definition of the Conservative Policy); his defense of the stand on unconditional surrender. There are the usual assortment of long speeches and short, of messages, statements, answers, etc. Only too fast the public forgets- and the market for these papers is shrinking. Read full book review >
ONWARDS TO VICTORY by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: July 1, 1944

Shops and Public Libraries already know their market for these annual collections of Prime Minister Churchill's speeches, papers, public statements. Their vitality is extraordinary. One hears him speak — over the air; one reads the speech for subtleties and overtones, in the next day's paper — and yet — in bookform — again one car et much that is worthwhile in reading through the year, dovetailing one into the other. Of course, many of the speeches and papers and were not previously available to the American public. They form an important part of contemporary historical records — from one of the world's great leaders. Calendars of events, notes, etc. add to their interest. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 6, 1943

Once again Winston Churchill proves that the power of his words lies in the spirit of the man behind the words, and that they read as well as they sound — a second time as well as a first. It is for this reason that the succession of volumes containing his speeches continue to find their place in the record of the years of war. It was interesting in read these after reading the Chiang Kai-shek speeches. Both men are reflected in their words; but to Churchill belongs the sense of fearless facing the unpleasant facts of defeat, as well as victory, the willingness to lay cards on the table, to accept the challenge of a functioning democracy. This collection — covering the year 1942 — spans an important turning point in the war, and some very vital moments. Of particular interest, today, is one speech I'd not read before, the one made to the coal miners in October, 1942, entitled Coal and War. It should be broadcast here and now, "must reading" for every member of the U.M.W. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 21, 1942

Previous records show that Churchill's books creep slowly on to best seller lists, and stay there a long time. This one forms virtually a step by step history of the war, starting with the death of Chamberlain, and carrying through December, 1941 — a period in which the fall of Greece and Crets, the invasion of Russia, the successes in Syria and Iran, the sinking of the Hood (and the retaliation in the sinking of the Bismarck), the rising tide of the Free French, the pendulum swing of the Libyan campaign, the spur of Lease-Lend, the horror of the hostage system, the swift onslaught of the Japanese from December 7th on:- all this and more through his speeches, not only to Parliament, but over the air, on special occasions both sides of the water. And always that perfect balance between challenge, realism, drama. Read full book review >
BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: April 14, 1941

While England Slept and Step by Step were prophetic and challenging, Churchill was considered by many as a Cassandra, speaking out of turn. Time has proved the soundness of his knowledge, the accuracy of his vision. The world has accepted him as democracy's champion and leader. Now, with Blood, Sweat and Tears, we have complete, through the memorable speech of February last, the speeches made since Churchill's star was again the ascendant and since he became Prime Minister. Important as milestones in the war; important as milestones in the history of democracy; important as great contributions to world literature. The publishers are backing it with a tremendous advertising and promotion campaign. The Book of the Month Club has selected it for May. Chance for plus sales on other two. Read full book review >
STEP BY STEP, 1936-1939 by Winston S.  Churchill
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 25, 1939

While England Slept was a best seller. It was a collection of the eminent statesman's speeches over a period of years, directed to the major thesis. Now comes a book that is even more timely, — his fortnightly letters on foreign policy and defense. Once again he shows himself more of a statesman than his enemies would credit him with being, more far-sighted than many would like to prove him, more tolerant and controlled than even his friends acclaim him. His is a far-seeing eye, and he is one of the few men of his type and class, who is willing to recognize where he has been wrong, and to restate his case. The material comes up to May of the current year. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 30, 1938

Churchill has had as full a career as statesman, soldier, war correspondent and author as any Britisher today. He is the outstanding speaker in the House of Commons. He has had a finger in most of the crucial events of the past twenty years. Therefore, what he says cannot be lightly passed over. This is a collection of speeches made on salient matters, and one of the most interesting things about the book is the brief outline of events and dates, leading up to the reason for his speech, and placed before each speech. Germany Disarmed, Germany Rearing and Germany Armed — the three main sections of the book, indicate the general trend — a challenge to England to prepare, since she has not prevented. But more than the question of preparedness is discussed. Abyssinia sanctions, collective security, etc. etc. — the moot problems of today are many of them touched upon. Definitely pro-military, he makes his point convincingly. Watch for notices of his itinerary, as he comes to this country to lecture in October. Great Contemporaries was front page matter and widened his American market. This is scarcely likely to repeat the sales, in view of the nature of the content, but it is a book for all who would keep abreast of thought (and emotions) in England. Read full book review >
GREAT CONTEMPORARIES by Winston S.  Churchill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1937

Autobiography, in that it contains segments of his early life and associates. Rosebery, F. E. Smith, Asquith, Morley and Balfour, Snowden, Curzon, Trotsky, T. E. Lawrence, French, the Kaiser, King Alfonso, and others are in these mellow recollections of sympathetically treated personages. Interesting, well written and worth reading. Read full book review >
NONFICTION
Released: June 15, 1937

This is an essential item for anyone who has the other volumes, and this should include libraries — public and college. With one more volume in prospect, the whole forms an exhaustive and definitive life of the greatest figure of his century in England. This particular volume carries him through the years 1705-1708, a period that has singular parallels with our own times. The story is told to a great extent through contemporary records. Liberally illustrated with diagrams and maps and reproductions of pictures and portraits. His style is vigorous always. Read full book review >
MARLBOROUGH by Winston S.  Churchill
NONFICTION
Released: March 15, 1935

The first two volumes of the Marlborough brought favorable returns throughout the country, and enthusiastic reviews. The postponement of volumes three and four to January, 1935, should not materially affect the sale, since it is an essential book for every purchaser of volumes one and two, and, furthermore, the announcement of its imminence should stimulate Christmas sales of the first two volumes and create an additional market for these. Keep this in mind, and notify December purchasers when the next volumes are on the eve of publication...Churchill picks up the thread of Marlborough's life with the accession of Queen Anne, and the stirring years that follow make excellent reading under the masterly touch of Winston Churchill. Portraiture and narrative genius characterize these volumes as they did the earlier ones. Not only is it an outstanding biography, but a brilliant picture of colorful days. Read full book review >
MARLBOROUGH by Winston S.  Churchill
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1933

Just to draw to your attention again the fact that Vol. VI is ready — covering the years 1708-1722. One of the great biographies of our times. Read full book review >