Books by Yann Martel

THE HIGH MOUNTAINS OF PORTUGAL by Yann Martel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 2, 2016

"Provocative ideas straitjacketed in an overdetermined plot."
Three grieving men's odysseys fitfully interconnect in this latest meditation on loss, faith, and belonging from Martel (Beatrice and Virgil, 2010, etc.).Read full book review >
BEATRICE AND VIRGIL by Yann Martel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2010

"As Henry asks Henry, 'Symbolic of what?'"
Whimsy takes a deadly serious turn in a novel that will enchant some readers and exasperate others. Read full book review >
THE FACTS BEHIND THE HELSINKI ROCCAMATIOS by Yann Martel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2004

"Overall, a disappointment. 'The Facts,' though, represents the best reason we've been given yet to keep reading Martel."
This mixed-bag of three stories and a novella first appeared in 1993, nine years before its Canadian author's Booker Prize winner, Life of Pi. Read full book review >
LIFE OF PI by Yann Martel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

A fable about the consolatory and strengthening powers of religion flounders about somewhere inside this unconventional coming-of-age tale, which was shortlisted for Canada's Governor General's Award. The story is told in retrospect by Piscine Molitor Patel (named for a swimming pool, thereafter fortuitously nicknamed "Pi"), years after he was shipwrecked when his parents, who owned a zoo in India, were attempting to emigrate, with their menagerie, to Canada. During 227 days at sea spent in a lifeboat with a hyena, an orangutan, a zebra, and a 450-pound Bengal tiger (mostly with the latter, which had efficiently slaughtered its fellow beasts), Pi found serenity and courage in his faith: a frequently reiterated amalgam of Muslim, Hindu, and Christian beliefs. The story of his later life, education, and mission rounds out, but does not improve upon, the alternately suspenseful and whimsical account of Pi's ordeal at sea—which offers the best reason for reading this otherwise preachy and somewhat redundant story of his Life. Read full book review >