Books by Yehoshua Kenaz

INFILTRATION by Yehoshua Kenaz
Released: Sept. 15, 2003

"An arduous read, but well worth the effort."
A prizewinning 1989 novel exhaustively explores the intersecting lives of Israeli soldiers-to-be. Read full book review >
RETURNING LOST LOVES by Yehoshua Kenaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2001

One thinks of Grand Hotel, or perhaps Terence Rattigan's popular play Separate Tables, while reading this entertaining Israeli novel, which joins in English translation its acclaimed author's earlier Musical Moment and The Way to the Cats. Read full book review >

MUSICAL MOMENT by Yehoshua Kenaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 1995

Four stories set against the sharply delineated background of Israel in the 1940's and 50's, with a single narrator who matures into selfhood in an often dangerous world. As in the harshly moving The Way to the Cats (1994), Israeli author Kenaz freezes moments in the kaleidoscopic changes of focus within the curious universe of the self. ``The Three-Legged Chicken'' chronicles a liberating moment in the life of a young boy who sees the landscape become ``strange'' as a voice—not his own but one from within—pronounces ``I,I,I,I.'' On the day of his grandfather's death he will witness ugliness and cruelty as men with a lust for spectacle crowd in to see a deformed chicken. Read full book review >

THE WAY TO THE CATS by Yehoshua Kenaz
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 23, 1994

Israeli author Kenaz, published in English for the first time here, probes the perimeter and then the anguished center of helpless old age, to find within bitterness and fear, heroism and a kind of nobility. Unlovely, griping Mrs. Yolanda Moscowitz, a former French teacher, is recovering from a broken leg in a nursing institution. ``A big heavy woman, her face very raddled...with narrow slits of eyes pristine blue, clear and bright, like scraps of a lost distant sky.'' She takes great pains with her hair however, as if it ``had some magic power to protect her.'' Yolanda has no family; husband and kin have drained her life of freedom and promise. Read full book review >