A page-turner for the toddler set.

READ REVIEW

LOOK LOOK

Everyday objects transform into various animals via lifted flaps.

“Look, it’s 1 donut. Or is it something else?” Across the gutter, readers see an isolated orange doughnut against a white background. With the opening of a double-creased gatefold, the doughnut changes into a white-snouted marmalade cat, with much of the doughnut revealed to be the curve of its tail and the rest its cheek. While many of these metamorphoses are delightful surprises in Baruzzi’s friendly, graphically flat cartoons (a tulip transforms into roosters’ combs, or a lemon becomes the body of one of 10 chicks), some are strained (the ice cream pop–to-tortoise and carrot-to-rabbit transformations force the critters into odd shapes). The project becomes a counting exercise as the number of each creature increases by one. The gatefold pages are thinner than normal board-book pages, but they should survive several rereadings.

A page-turner for the toddler set. (Board book. 18 mos.-3)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2016

ISBN: 978-988-8341-20-7

Page Count: 30

Publisher: Minedition

Review Posted Online: Oct. 19, 2016

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

It’s sweet, but it thematically (and eponymously) replicates Dan Pinto and Benn Sutton’s Hedgehug (2011)—with much less verve

HEDGEHUGS

How do you hug if you’re a hedgehog?

Horace and Hattie are best friends who like to spend time together making daisy chains, splashing in puddles, and having tea parties. But they are OK doing things on their own, too: Hattie dances in the bluebells, while Horace searches the woods for spiders. But no matter what they do, together or apart, there’s one thing that they’ve found impossible: hugging. Each season, they try something new that will enable them to cushion their spines and snuggle up. Snow hugs are too cold, hollow-log hugs are too bumpy, strawberry hugs are too sticky, and autumn-leaf hugs are too scratchy. But a chance encounter with some laundry drying on a line may hold the answer to their problem—as well as to the universal mystery of lost socks. Tapper’s illustrations are a mix of what appears to be digital elements and photographed textures from scraps of baby clothes. While the latter provide pleasing textures, the hedgehogs are rendered digitally. Though cute, they are rather stiff and, well, spiky. Also, the typeface choice unfortunately makes the D in “hedgehug” look like a fancy lowercase A, especially to those still working on their reading skills.

It’s sweet, but it thematically (and eponymously) replicates Dan Pinto and Benn Sutton’s Hedgehug (2011)—with much less verve . (Picture book. 2-5)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-62779-404-6

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: Sept. 21, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

It is a hug, a kiss, and a valentine rolled into one—and just as fleeting.

HAPPY HEART

In this heart-shaped confection, the narrator declares their love for young readers.

The edges of each page are cut into different designs to emulate the sun’s rays, the outlines of trees, the Earth, flowers, and more and are frosted with a sparkly layer of glitter that resists the energetic rubbing of little fingers. In the center of each image is a tiny, emoji-like icon grinning at readers, and brightly colored accompanying spot art is sprinkled throughout. Enthusiastic, mostly rhyming text appears in a multicolored type on the verso. The pages increase in size with each page turn, for a layered look when closed, culminating with a giant heart that bookends the smaller opening one as the prose declares: “For you my heart grows / because I love you so!” While the binding is narrow, the whole enterprise is considerably sturdy. It’s an entirely forgettable but bright bagatelle, good for a few readings.

It is a hug, a kiss, and a valentine rolled into one—and just as fleeting. (Board book. 6 mos.-3)

Pub Date: Dec. 3, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5344-3202-4

Page Count: 14

Publisher: Little Simon/Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Nov. 24, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more